mirror

(redirected from Mirror Sites)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Mirror Sites: Download mirror

mir·ror

(mir'ŏr),
A polished surface reflecting the rays of light reflected from objects in front of it.
[Fr. miroir, fr. L. miror, to wonder at]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
noun An archiving device written to more than one hard disk simultaneously, so that if one disk fails, the computer continues to function without loss of data
verb To maintain an exact copy of a file or database
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mirror

Informatics noun An archiving device written to more than one hard disk simultaneously, so that if one disk fails, the computer continues to function without loss of data verb To maintain an exact copy of a file or database. See FTP, Web Paranormal See Mind mirror.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mir·ror

(mir'ŏr)
A polished surface reflecting the rays of light reflected from objects in front of it.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mirror

A surface capable of reflecting light rays and forming optical images. Such surfaces are smooth or polished, made of highly polished metal, or a thin film of metal (e.g. aluminium) on glass, quartz or plastic. Object distance l and image distance l′ relate to the focal distance f or the radius of curvature r of the mirror, as follows
2/r represents the refractive power of the mirror, in air. If the medium that contains the incident and reflected rays is n, the power becomes F = 2n/r and the focal length, f = r/2n (Fig. M12). See focal length; fundamental paraxial equation; catadioptric system.
back surface mirror A mirror which reflects from the back surface of a refracting layer, usually glass. See front surface mirror.
concave mirror A mirror with a spherical concave surface forming an erect, magnified, virtual image when the distance from the mirror is less than the focal distance and an inverted real image when the object distance is greater than the focal distance (Fig. M12).
convex mirror A mirror with a spherical convex surface forming a virtual, erect and diminished image (Fig. M12).
front surface mirror A mirror that reflects directly from its front surface. The advantages of this type are that, unlike back surface mirrors, there is no chromatic effect as the glass is not used optically, therefore ultraviolet rays can be used which would otherwise be absorbed in the glass and there is no ghost reflection from the front surface. However, these mirrors can be easily scratched and the coating may tarnish. Often a coating of silicon monoxide is evaporated on top of the surface, but this causes a loss of reflectivity. See ghost image; back surface mirror.
plane mirror A mirror whose surface is plane and forms a virtual image of the same size as the object. Object and image distances are equal.
semi-silvered mirror See beam splitter.
mirror writing Writing backward, Latin letters being written from right to left and the details of the letters reversed. The writing thus appears normal when viewed in a mirror. Syn. retrography.
Fig. M12 Image of an object O formed in A, a concave mirror and B, a convex mirror. Four rays are drawn in each case for completeness, but two would suffice (C, centre of curvature; F ′, focal point; f ′, focal length; l and l ′, object and image length; r , radius of curvature)enlarge picture
Fig. M12 Image of an object O formed in A, a concave mirror and B, a convex mirror. Four rays are drawn in each case for completeness, but two would suffice (C, centre of curvature; F′, focal point; f′, focal length; l and l′, object and image length; r, radius of curvature)
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

mir·ror

(mir'ŏr)
A polished surface reflecting the rays of light reflected from objects in front of it; particularly useful in visualizing structures in the oral cavity.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The principle of multiple mirror sites is to provide exact duplicate copies of the database accessible at a variety of access points around the world.
The custom of creating mirror sites and "caches," which comes from the necessity to economize on busy lines, corresponds deeply to the spirit of the Internet, which is to create a sort of canvas of correspondences and hyperlinks.
Trial versions could be freely downloaded from Netscape mirror sites and many a copy was handed out on PC magazine-cover CDs.
Most storage companies simultaneously back up client data to separate locations, called mirror sites, just in case something happens at their site.
If he finds an overseas market, he'll set up mirror sites in Spanish or Japanese--"accounting is international" he said.
It is part of a major new Brexit survey of almost 220,000 readers of Johnson Press, Newsquest and Trinity Mirror sites.
"We still don't know where the flooding attack came from but right now, we will try to increase our capacity and put up mirror sites, so people can be diverted to the mirror sites without affecting our operations," Solidum said.
A grassroots army of supporters have defended WikiLeaks, setting up mirror sites, fighting off computer attacks and donating thousands of pounds online.
But in the anonymity of the online world, Internet-savvy youths use mirror sites and proxy servers to explore alternative versions of the official history and to discuss their own frustrations with their government's clumsy efforts at censorship.
The program works by splitting large files into smaller pieces, along with actively searching for mirror sites along the way.
Access to the OCW site, which requires no registration, is available worldwide via 80 mirror sites on university campuses from Africa to Asia.
Editorial deals with issues related to the law library collection development with information on such topics as: planning for distance learning; Web mirror sites; trust vs.