Doomsday Clock

(redirected from Minutes to midnight)
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A symbolic clock face, maintained since 1947 by atomic scientists at the University of Chicago, that views humans as minutes from midnight—i.e., catastrophic destruction
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Rachel Bronson, the president of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, "Because of the extraordinary danger of the current moment, The clock is now two minutes to midnight.
In 2016, the clock remained unmoved, its hands staying at three minutes to midnight.
Minutes to Midnight redeems itself in this quest by being admirably ambitious in its scope.
In 1953, as the US and Soviet Union tested hydrogen bombs within nine months of each other, the time was set at two minutes to midnight.
Seven minutes to midnight is where the clock was set when it was first unveiled in 1947 by the Board of Directors of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists at the University of Chicago.
What bothered the folks at the Bulletin most was not the seeming appropriation of the clock--although that was upsetting, too--but that the hands of the clock shown on the American Prospect's cover were set at four minutes to midnight instead of seven.
If South Africa in 1977 was stuck at "five minutes to midnight," as R.
The songs on OUT OF ASHES began to take shape during some downtime Linkin Park had before the band began recording their double-platinum 2007 album Minutes to Midnight.
The board warned in 2016 that three minutes to midnight is "too close, far too close" but since the concluded that dangerous rhetoric has become commonplace in the world, the group of scientists decided to move the clock half a minute closer, setting it at two and a half minutes to midnight, Bronson said.
The Doomsday Clock, devised by the Chicago-based Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, now stands at three minutes to midnight, or doomsday.
It came closest to doomsday in 1953, when the start of the nuclear arms race pushed its hand to two minutes to midnight, and moved the farthest away in 1991, when the signing of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) by the United States and the Soviet Union gave the world 17 minutes until midnight.
THE title of tonight's episode, Seven Minutes To Midnight, refers to the hypothetical Doomsday Clock that was started by atomic scientists during the Cold War to show just how close the human race is to blowing itself up.