meniscus

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meniscus

 [mĕ-nis´kus] (L.)
something of crescent shape, as the concave or convex surface of a column of liquid in a pipet or medication cup, or a crescent-shaped fibrocartilage (semilunar cartilage) in the knee joint. adj., adj menis´cal.
Measuring medication at the meniscus. From Lammon et al., 1996.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·nis·cus

, pl.

me·nis·ci

(mĕ-nis'kŭs, mĕ-nis'sī),
1. Synonym(s): meniscus lens
2. A crescentic intraarticular fibrocartilage found in certain joints.
3. A crescentic fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee and the acromioclavicular, sternoclavicular, and temporomandibular joints.
[G. mēniskos, crescent]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

meniscus

(mə-nĭs′kəs)
n. pl. me·nisci (-nĭs′ī, -kī, -kē) or me·niscuses
1. A crescent-shaped body.
2. A concavo-convex lens.
3. The curved upper surface of a nonturbulent liquid in a container that is concave if the liquid wets the container walls and convex if it does not.
4. A cartilage disk that acts as a cushion between the ends of bones that meet in a joint.

me·nis′cal (-kəl), me·nis′cate′ (-kăt′)(-koid′)(mĕn′ĭs-koid′l), me·nis′coid′ (-koid′)(mĕn′ĭs-koid′l), men′is·coi′dal (mĕn′ĭs-koid′l) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

meniscus

Either of two crescent-shaped cartilages atop the tibial plates that stabilise the knee, absorb shock, assist joint lubrication and limit joint flexion/extension.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·nis·cus

, pl. menisci (mĕ-niśkŭs, -kī) [TA]
1. Synonym(s): meniscus lens.
2. [TA] Any crescent-shaped structure.
3. A crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee, theacromio- and sternoclavicular and the temporomandibular joints.
4. The crescentic curvature of the surface of a liquid standing in a narrow vessel (e.g., pipette, burette).
[G. mēniskos, crescent]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

meniscus

  1. the top of a liquid column made either concave or convex by capillarity.
  2. an intervertebral disc of fibro-cartilage.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

me·nis·cus

, pl. menisci (mĕ-niskŭs, -kī) [TA]
1. [TA] Any crescent-shaped structure.
2. A crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee, the acromio- and sternoclavicular and the temporomandibular joints.
3. The crescentic curvature of the surface of a liquid standing in a narrow vessel.
Synonym(s): meniscus lens.
[G. mēniskos, crescent]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about meniscus

Q. I am scheduled for scope surgery for a torn meniscus on my knee and what is the duration for recovery? Has anyone had this surgery for a torn meniscus? How did you deal with this recovery?

A. The recovery process is individual, and you cannot predict it in advance. I know someone who has done it and was able to go back to exercising regularly after 2 months. I would think the recovery from the surgery itself is a matter of few weeks until you can walk properly, however you should still give your knee a break and rest for a while after.

More discussions about meniscus
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Bert Mendelbaum, who also treated Brosnan for a tear on his miniscus on his left knee several years ago, operated on the 48-year-old on Friday at 8.30am.
It can be shown that the time required for the liquid miniscus to fall from the upper mark to the lower mark or "the efflux time" is linearly related to the solution kinematic viscosity through a constant that depends on the capillary size.
In this method, unatomized MEKP is introduced into the resin spray close to the exit point of the resin nozzle, so the resin is hit in its miniscus. This reportedly leads to an even dispersal of the catalyst to all of the edges of the material spray.