mimicry

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mimicry

(mĭm′ĭ-krē)
n. pl. mimic·ries
Biology The resemblance of one organism to another or to an object in its surroundings for concealment and protection from predators.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mimicry

(mim′i-krē)
The practice or instance of one organism copying or mimicking another organism or object, sometimes for concealment from predators.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

mimicry

the adoption by one species of any of the properties of another, such as colour, habits, structure. Particularly common in insects, two main forms of mimicry are recognized:
  1. Batesian mimicry, where two species have the same appearance (often warning colours) but one (the ‘model’) is distasteful to predators. The mimic gains advantage because predators learn to associate appearance with bad taste and leave both model and mimic uneaten.
  2. Mullerian mimicry, where both model and mimic are distasteful to predators and both gain from the other's distastefulness since the predator learns to avoid all similar-looking forms, whichever it eats first.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, innovation spreads within a social milieu out of mimetism, with some individuals taking decisions after observing the attitudes of prior adopters.
In Russo's short stories, the danger comes from two factors: first, we love "to put labels on people"; second, "mimetism works."
He writes: "mimetism is a source of continual conflict.
Cukor's films, on this view, get reduced to mimetism by their emphasis upon performance.
Eventually, from his infantilism, the elementary type of mimetism during Michael's growth to his maturity, the hero consciously experiences his essence--a projection but, paradoxically, a deep-rooted introspection as well.
7 Luce Irigaray's celebrated concept of "mimetism" in ecriture feminine further illuminates the potential effects of Davis's style.
These needleworks, despite their precious size, are striking in their mimetism. It was surprising to be able to recognize the doughy face of serial killer Arthur Shawcross from a cluster of about 20 stitches in varying shades of gray.
The novel is written in the style that was to become characteristic for Lewis, based on a "pyrotechnic" combination of narrative sophistication, satirical genius, mimetism producing hilarity and verve, and presenting the reader simultaneously two contrasting versions of the same scene:
We believe this can be due to various specific characteristics of some species, such as mimetism and aposematic coloration, considered to be defense mechanisms, beyond consequences caused by fear, myths and popular beliefs.
The Europeanization of the Balkan area received belated attention with studies centred on candidate countries (some of them receiving membership status afterwards) which aimed at explaining the Europeanization process in the region as a combination between "Europeanization mechanisms"--under the form of "coercion" (the "control" and/or "conditionality" mechanisms are discussed) and "mimetism" (coining the "contagion" and/or "consent" mechanisms) -, and the so-called "confining conditions" which the literature categorised as "structural", "transitional", "systemic", and "state-building/ nation-formation" (Demetropoulou, 2002: 89-90).