torr

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torr

 [tor]
a unit of pressure equal to one millimeter of mercury (mm Hg), or 133.3 pascals.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

torr

(tōr),
A unit of pressure sufficient to support a 1-mm column of mercury at 0°C against the standard acceleration of gravity at 45° north latitude (980.621 cm/s2); equivalent to 1333.224 dynes/cm2, 1.333224 millibars, 1.35951 cm of H2O, 133.3224 newtons/m2 (or Pa); 1 atmosphere (atm) equals 760 Torr.
[Evangelista Torricelli]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Torricelli,

Evangelista, Italian scientist, 1608-1647.
torr - a unit of pressure.
torricellian vacuum - a vacuum above the mercury in a barometer tube.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Under our own moderate drying conditions of 50 [degrees] C/17 h/110 millitorr, we obtain an exponent of 3.8 [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 9 OMITTED] that matches the previously published work.
Industry-standard gauges measure pressure from atmosphere to 1 milliTorr. Mini-convention modules are convenient, low-cost solution for vacuum measurements where front panel controls are not needed and vacuum system is controlled by computer.
Consider that the gas load, during a pumpdown below 1 millitorr or so will be almost entirely water vapor desorbing from O-rings and from the chamber's surfaces.
By the time the total pressure falls to approximately 1 millitorr, the gas in the original volume is almost gone.
The sputtering process typically begins by evacuating a vacuum chamber to a base pressure of [10.sup.-6][10.sup.-10] torr, depending on the process, and then backfilling the evacuated chamber with a continuous flow of a gas such as Ar to a pressure of 1-100 millitorr. A negative potential of 0.5-5 kV is applied to the target to initiate positive-ion Ar bombardment while the substrate remains grounded.
Oil-sealed mechanical pumps cannot easily reach roughing pressures below several millitorr. The amount of gas that any getter system has to sorb at these pressures would exhaust its ability to pump if it had to pump down repeatedly from these high pressures.