Million Women Study

Million Women Study

A national study involving more than one million UK women aged 50 and over, which is a collaboration between Cancer Research UK and the NHS, partly funded by the Medical Research Council and Health and Safety Executive (UK Government). While the primary focus is on the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use, the large size of the study allows other questions to be asked, including how various reproductive and lifestyle factors affect older women’s health. The MWS is also assessing how diet, exercise, employment patterns, oral contraceptive use, childbirth and breastfeeding, and family history of illness impact on cancer and to other conditions such as fractures, gallbladder disease and cardiovascular disease.

Conclusion
For every 10,000 women on oestrogen for 10 years, there will be 5 extra breast cancers, and 19 extra cancers in women receiving combined HRT.
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The Million Women Study is the largest study of women's health in the world.
The research -- published in The Lancet -- is based on the One Million Women study of 50 to 64 year olds in the UK.
In particular, the French researchers compared their results with data from the Million Women Study in the United Kingdom.
The WHI and the Million Women Study [3] created intense debate on HRT use.
The British Journal of Cancer published a remarkable study in 2014, a large prospective study of women in the United Kingdom, known as the Million Women Study, which looked at organic food consumption.
In the British Million Women Study, one drink a day increased women's risk of breast cancer by 12 percent, with even three to six drinks weekly posing some risk.
"Of course people who are ill tend to be unhappier than those who are well, but the UK Million Women Study shows that happiness and unhappiness do not themselves have any direct effect on death rates."
The largest study so |far on mobile phones and cancer is part of the Million Women Study and included around 790,000 women.
Participants included 1.1 million women in the United Kingdom with no history of cancer, heart disease, stroke, blood clots, or diabetes who joined the Million Women study in 1996-2001.
The volunteers, all aged 50 and over, will have already been recruited to existing population-scale studies such as UK Biobank and the Million Women Study.
A trio of studies - the Collaborative Reanalysis (CR); the Women's Health Initiative (WHI); and the Million Women Study (MWS) - prompted the use of HRT to tumble, starting in 2002, after they concluded that it causes breast cancer.