torr

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torr

 [tor]
a unit of pressure equal to one millimeter of mercury (mm Hg), or 133.3 pascals.

torr

(tōr),
A unit of pressure sufficient to support a 1-mm column of mercury at 0°C against the standard acceleration of gravity at 45° north latitude (980.621 cm/s2); equivalent to 1333.224 dynes/cm2, 1.333224 millibars, 1.35951 cm of H2O, 133.3224 newtons/m2 (or Pa); 1 atmosphere (atm) equals 760 Torr.
[Evangelista Torricelli]

Torricelli,

Evangelista, Italian scientist, 1608-1647.
torr - a unit of pressure.
torricellian vacuum - a vacuum above the mercury in a barometer tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, an outdoor temperature increase of 15 degrees Celsius was associated with a systolic blood pressure decrease of 13.8 millimeters of mercury in the oldest participants, and by 9.9 ml in the youngest participants.
Compared to the group with the highest intake, those who got less than 60 mg/day averaged 11 millimeters of mercury (mm/Hg) higher for systolic pressure and 6 mm/Hg higher for diastolic pressure.
If we cut our national average intake of sodium by about 2,300 mg, from two teaspoons a day to one, it could lower the population's average systolic blood pressure by about 2.5 millimeters of mercury. That may not seem like much, but it translates into a five percent reduction in the coronary death rate and a nine percent reduction in deaths from stroke.
Atmospheric pressure will drop from 759 millimeters to 756 millimeters of mercury; relative humidity will be 65-75% at night, 45-55% at daytime.
By one month, blueberry consumption led to a mean 5.6 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) decrease in systolic blood pressure, but no change in diastolic blood pressure.
"If you find your blood pressure is high -- defined as being at or above 140/90 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) -- you can lower it by losing weight, exercising regularly and eating healthy, among other things," Adubko said.
Healthy blood pressure is less than 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg).
Researchers examined the blood-pressure histories of 1,252 adults enrolled in the long-term Framingham Heart Study and found that most generally maintained a systolic blood pressure less than 120 to 125 millimeters of mercury (mmHg).
Under these new guidelines, a person is categorized as having high blood pressure if their systolic blood pressure (or the top number that measuresthe blood pressure when the heart beats) is 130 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) or higher and their diastolic blood pressure (or the bottom number that measures blood pressure between heart beats) is 80 mmHg or higher.
Blood pressure below 120/80 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) is considered normal; 120-139/80-89 is considered prehypertension; and 140/90 or higher is considered hypertension.
The study evaluated patients with maximum baseline intraocular pressures (IOPs) ranging from above 20 to below 36 mmHg (millimeters of mercury).
Some people have low-tension or normal-tension glaucoma, in which, optic nerve damage occurs even when the IOP is in the normal range (12-22 millimeters of mercury).

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