Miller


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Mil·ler

(mil'ĕr),
Willoughby D., U.S. dentist, 1853-1907. See: Miller chemicoparasitic theory.

Mil·ler

(mil'ĕr),
Thomas Grier, early 20th-century U.S. physician. See: Miller-Abbott tube.
References in classic literature ?
"'There is no good in my going to see little Hans as long as the snow lasts,' the Miller used to say to his wife, 'for when people are in trouble they should be left alone, and not be bothered by visitors.
"'But could we not ask little Hans up here?' said the Miller's youngest son.
"Hold, friend!" cried Robin to the Miller; whereupon he turned slowly, with the weight of the bag upon his shoulder, and looked at each in turn all bewildered, for though a good stout man his wits did not skip like roasting chestnuts.
Skiff Miller looked at her sharply, seeking in her face the guile her words had led him to suspect.
He's going to college." And in this way Miss Miller continued to converse upon the affairs of her family and upon other topics.
'There!' said the criminal Miller triumphantly, as he took up the odd trick at the conclusion of a hand; 'that could not have been played better, I flatter myself; impossible to have made another trick!'
It was not with dry eyes that Jones heard this narrative; when it was ended he took Mrs Miller apart with him into another room, and, delivering her his purse, in which was the sum of L50, desired her to send as much of it as she thought proper to these poor people.
Miss Miller signed to me to sit on a bench near the door, then walking up to the top of the long room she cried out -
``If thou best a miller,'' answered Gurth, undauntedly, making his weapon play around his head with equal dexterity, ``thou art doubly a thief, and I, as a true man, bid thee defiance.''
The poor miller was much horrified by these tidings, and went in to his wife with a heavy heart to tell her and his relations of the fatal bargain he had just struck with the nixy.
Miller called the partners together and threw up his share in the company, declaring his intention of joining the party of trappers.
The fishermen and the millers stood staring in amazement at the two figures, so very different to all appearance from ordinary men, and were wholly unable to make out the drift of the observations and questions Don Quixote addressed to them; and coming to the conclusion that they were madmen, they left them and betook themselves, the millers to their mills, and the fishermen to their huts.