butterfat

(redirected from Milkfat)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

butterfat

(bŭt′ər-făt′)
n.
The natural fat of milk from which butter is made, consisting largely of the glycerides of oleic, stearic, and palmitic acids. Also called milk fat.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fluid milk is categorized in the store by the percentage of fat in the milk, from skim and nonfat, to whole milk, which has had no milkfat removed.
Milk is very mild in flavor but the richer, creamier, flavor increases as the percentage of milkfat increases.
The milkfat particles are small, making it superior to cow's milk for digestibility.
Biomedical studies using animal models have shown that the CLA in milkfat is among the most potent naturally occurring anti-carcinogens.
Porositiy of whey protein-based microcapsules containing anhydrous milkfat measured by Gas Displacement Picnometry.
Consider fresh milk and the introduction of milkfat standard.
Recent studies in animal models provide insight into the possible mechanisms of the cancer fighting properties of milkfat components such as conjugated linoleic acid, Vaccenic acid, sphingomyelin and 13-methyltetradecanioc acid.
If milkfat hydrolysis occurs after pasteurization and homogenization, the potential exists to negatively affect frothing, McGregor said.
Even with the deletion of this standard, frozen dairy desserts formulated by replacing milkfat with vegetable fat may still manufactured, but would be labeled with a common or usual name that is more descriptive to consumers such as "frozen dessert" or "frozen dairy dessert," if the milk solids predominate.
Physical Chemistry: State Transitions and Reaction Rates in Concentrated Food Systems; Biopolymer-Biopolymer Interactions at Interfaces and Their Impact on Food Colloid Stability; Triacylglyceride Crystallization in Vegetable Oils; The Functionality of Milkfat Fractions in Confectionery and Plastic Fats; Stabilization Mechanisms for Anthocyanin: The Case for Copolymerization Reactions.