mild traumatic brain injury


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

mild traumatic brain injury

An immediate and transient impairment of neural function, such as alteration of consciousness, disturbance of vision, equilibrium and other similar symptoms. Features common to MTBI  include limited or absent loss of consciousness, limited post-traumatic amnesia, and an initial Glasgow Coma Scale of ≥ 13 of 15.

mild traumatic brain injury

Dinging, mild traumatic brain injury Sports medicine An '… immediate and transient impairment of neural function such as alteration of consciousness, disturbance of vision, equilibrium, and other similar symptoms.' features common to MTBI are '…limited or absent loss of consciousness, limited post-traumatic amnesia, and an initial Glasgow Coma Scale of ≥ 13 of 15.'

mild traumatic brain injury,

n disruption of brain function by trauma characterized by but not limited to a loss of consciousness, memory loss surrounding the trauma, confusion during the incident, loss of consciousness for no more than thirty minutes, and posttraumatic amnesia lasting less than 24 hours.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tissue vulnerability is increased following repetitive mild traumatic brain injury in the rat.
Those sustaining a mild traumatic brain injury within three months before cognitive testing and those sustaining one within two years after cognitive testing had similar cognitive scores.
With regard to EEG evaluation in patients with mild traumatic brain injury, one researcher notes:
A new approach to predicting postconcussion syndrome after mild traumatic brain injury based upon eye movement function.
The strong associations between mild traumatic brain injury, PTSD, depression, and physical health symptoms in combat veterans reinforce the need for a multidisciplinary approach centered in primary care," said Dr.
Toward a Neuropychological Model of Functional Disability After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, 6 NEUROPSYCHOLOGY 371 (1992).
It has been estimated that approximately 25% of individuals who sustain a mild traumatic brain injury (mild TBI) experience delayed symptoms to the degree that daily functioning is significantly impaired (Harrington, Malec, Cicerone, and Katz, 1993).
Later chapters deal with cognitive communication deficits associated with right hemisphere brain damage, dementia, combat-related mild traumatic brain injury, and traumatic brain injury.
The contributions of self-reported injury characteristics and psychiatric symptoms to cognitive functioning in OEF/OIF veterans with mild traumatic brain injury.