migration

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Related to Migrations: Human migrations, Great Migrations

mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn),
1. Passing from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
2. Synonym(s): diapedesis
3. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
4. Movement of molecules during electrophoresis, centrifugation, or diffusion.
[L. migro, pp. -atus, to move from place to place]

migration

Informatics
The process of moving an information system and/or software—including data—from an old to new operational environment in accordance with a software quality system.

Genetics
The movement of one or more individuals between reproductively isolated populations. 

Vox populi
Movement of one or more animals from point A to point B; as in, the migration of birds.

mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn)
1. Passage from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
2. Synonym(s): diapedesis.
3. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
4. Movement of molecules during electrophoresis.
5. Geographic spread of disease-causing agents, rectors, or populations.
[L. migro, pp.-atus, to move from place to place]

migration

any cyclical movements (usually annual) that occur during the life history of an animal at definite intervals, and always including a return trip from where they began. The exact derivation of the word is from the Latin ‘migrate’ meaning to go from one place to another, but biologically a return journey is part of the accepted definition of the term, the outward journey being termed EMIGRATION and the inward journey IMMIGRATION.

mi·gra·tion

(mī-grā'shŭn)
1. Movement of a tooth or teeth out of normal position.
2. Passing from one part to another, said of certain morbid processes or symptoms.
[L. migro, pp.-atus, to move from place to place]
References in periodicals archive ?
The second part of the book focuses on the actors of stepwise migration and delves closely into the dynamics of stepwise migration trajectories of domestic workers.
There's also a very handy resource that I recommend--Database Migration Guide: Step-by-step guidance for modernizing your data assets available at https://datamigration.microsoft.com.
Given this understanding and the emphases of the discipline, it does not come as a surprise that missiologists have found interest in the phenomenon of migration and have addressed it in a variety of ways.
In other words, within missiology, it is possible to approach migration as a phenomenon or an issue in various ways; this is demonstrated in the way migration is addressed within the field.
This article aims to contribute to filling these gaps in the literature by looking beyond the usual suspects in the field of migration governance.
Drawing on theoretical insights from these works, I develop the concept of global migration governors in relation to IOs and shift the focus from discussions of global migration governance as a constantly changing structure to global migration governors as sources of agency and, consequently, to the outcomes that flow from their interactions.
Currently there does not exist one single coherent theory regarding international migration, but a group of theories, that developed isolated, sometimes being limited by the differences among the areas of study (Anghel and Horvath, 2009: 29).
Based on industry, the global cloud migration market is studied across aerospace & defense, banking, financial services & insurance, consumer goods & retail, education, energy & utilities, government, healthcare & life sciences, information technology, manufacturing, media & entertainment, telecommunication, transportation & logistics, and travel & hospitality.
The inclusion of migration in the post-2015 development agenda is therefore likely to add to the longstanding calls for better data on migration and development.
Such a global context has allowed the authors to specify the processes that constitute the link between the different types of global changes through a particular type of conceptualization that brings to the fore how women's strategic migration projects have emerged in the play of global chains.
contends that host country governments should expand opportunities for international labor migration. Immigration policy in high-income countries should take into account its impact on migrants and on individuals in developing countries.