midwifery

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midwifery

 [mid´wif-re, mid´wi-fer-e]
the practice of assisting at childbirth.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mid·wife·ry

(mid-wif'ĕ-rē),
Independent care of essentially normal, healthy women and infants by a midwife, prepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, and/or obstetrically in a hospital, birth center, or home setting, and including normal delivery of the infant, with medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral of cases in which abnormalities develop; strong emphasis is placed on educational preparation of parents for child-bearing and child-rearing, with an orientation toward childbirth as a normal physiologic process requiring minimal intervention.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

midwifery

The health profession which provides care to childbearing women during pregnancy, labour and delivery, after childbirth and with breastfeeding.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mid·wife·ry

(mid-wif'ĕ-rē)
Independent care of essentially normal, healthy women and infants by a midwife, antepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, or obstetrically in a hospital, birth center, or home setting, and including normal delivery of the infant, with medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral of cases in which abnormalities develop; strong emphasis is placed on educational preparation of parents for child-bearing and child-rearing, with an orientation toward childbirth as a normal physiologic process requiring minimal intervention.
See also: doula
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

midwifery

The nursing speciality concerned with the conduct of antenatal care, labour and childbirth. Midwifery differs from OBSTETRICS to the extent that it is concerned primarily with the normal. Complications and undue difficulties are managed or supervised by doctors specializing in obstetrics.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It would be the more experienced core midwives who would step into this role.
Moreover, midwives' integrated, front-line approach helps them bridge the gap between isolated rural health centers and the communities they serve.
"Midwives have a medical and penal responsibility since they monitor pregnant women in all parts of the country notably in rural areas where there is an obvious lack of specialist doctors, while they do not benefit of a legal protection since they are just senior technicians in obstetrics and do not have the status of midwife as in advanced countries," she explained.
England remains 3,500 full-time midwives short - a shortage that has now lasted for over a generation.
'All the important information nurses and midwives need to know about renewal of their registration is in the reminder or is only a click away,' Dr Cusack said.
In the summer of 2010, an idea took root that perhaps midwives in Montana could band together, pool resources and practice in closer proximity to each other, turning solitude into solidarity.
"I was keen to find a place with good midwives, as I had heard from friends that many hospitals here do not pay attention to the choice of their midwives and do not give them a major role," she said.
H-2, as a result of the 1989 application by the Alberta Association of Midwives for designation under the Act.
Currently, nurses and midwives (who are basic rate UK taxpayers) are eligible for 20 [pounds sterling] tax relief on their annual registration fee of 100 [pounds sterling], yet few are taking advantage.
"Conditions are still very difficult for midwives but, gradually, we are seeing extra staff enter the service and promises of more to come.
During the last decade the number of births in the country has risen by more than 22% but over the same period the number of midwives has risen by less than 17%, an RCM spokeswoman said.
She said: "The support I received from the midwives was tremendous and made me realise with good support it can be done.'' Helen Shallow, head of midwifery for the Trust, said: "Midwives from all areas of maternity such as the antenatal clinics, maternity awards, birth centres along with community midwives were there.