midwifery

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midwifery

 [mid´wif-re, mid´wi-fer-e]
the practice of assisting at childbirth.

mid·wife·ry

(mid-wif'ĕ-rē),
Independent care of essentially normal, healthy women and infants by a midwife, prepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, and/or obstetrically in a hospital, birth center, or home setting, and including normal delivery of the infant, with medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral of cases in which abnormalities develop; strong emphasis is placed on educational preparation of parents for child-bearing and child-rearing, with an orientation toward childbirth as a normal physiologic process requiring minimal intervention.

midwifery

[mid′wīf(ə)rē]
Etymology: AS, midd + wif
the employment of a person who is qualified by special training and experience to assist a woman in childbirth. See also midwife.

midwifery

The health profession which provides care to childbearing women during pregnancy, labour and delivery, after childbirth and with breastfeeding.

mid·wife·ry

(mid-wif'ĕ-rē)
Independent care of essentially normal, healthy women and infants by a midwife, antepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, or obstetrically in a hospital, birth center, or home setting, and including normal delivery of the infant, with medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral of cases in which abnormalities develop; strong emphasis is placed on educational preparation of parents for child-bearing and child-rearing, with an orientation toward childbirth as a normal physiologic process requiring minimal intervention.
See also: doula

midwifery

The nursing speciality concerned with the conduct of antenatal care, labour and childbirth. Midwifery differs from OBSTETRICS to the extent that it is concerned primarily with the normal. Complications and undue difficulties are managed or supervised by doctors specializing in obstetrics.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Royal College of Midwives published a report last month warning of serious pressure on midwife numbers in the future.
Many competent midwives are unable to use their life-saving skills because they lack the tools to provide the highest standard of care," said Frances Ganges, ICM's Chief Executive.
links to a list of commonly used medicines in maternity care including midwives exemptions and medicines monographs.
In the summer of 2010, an idea took root that perhaps midwives in Montana could band together, pool resources and practice in closer proximity to each other, turning solitude into solidarity.
Meanwhile, the Netmums survey of 500 women found that most did not know what information they should get from midwives.
Deputy Conway added: "I was pleased to receive assurances new midwives are being recruited at Portlaoise Hospital and seven will start within weeks.
Ibrahim said greater responsibility needs to be given to midwives during birth.
She said hospital midwives also provided support in emergencies, helped with other procedures and assisted as second midwife at births.
AoThey used to shower midwives with gifts in gratitude especially in tough cases; they were so popular due to the nature of their job which enabled them to know people more and more; furthermore, many of them treated women for infertility and according to my grandmother they led interesting lives and knew many secrets but had the ability to handle it,Ao the 47-year-old asserted.
Nepali women need more midwives to save their and their babies' lives," it added.
Every year Australia's midwives expertly assist mothers to safely birth their babies, caring for mothers, their newborn and families with professional kindness and skill.
It is hoped that the newly-qualified midwives will ease pressures at the University Hospital of Wales unit caused by staff shortages.