midwifery

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midwifery

 [mid´wif-re, mid´wi-fer-e]
the practice of assisting at childbirth.

mid·wife·ry

(mid-wif'ĕ-rē),
Independent care of essentially normal, healthy women and infants by a midwife, prepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, and/or obstetrically in a hospital, birth center, or home setting, and including normal delivery of the infant, with medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral of cases in which abnormalities develop; strong emphasis is placed on educational preparation of parents for child-bearing and child-rearing, with an orientation toward childbirth as a normal physiologic process requiring minimal intervention.

midwifery

[mid′wīf(ə)rē]
Etymology: AS, midd + wif
the employment of a person who is qualified by special training and experience to assist a woman in childbirth. See also midwife.

midwifery

The health profession which provides care to childbearing women during pregnancy, labour and delivery, after childbirth and with breastfeeding.

mid·wife·ry

(mid-wif'ĕ-rē)
Independent care of essentially normal, healthy women and infants by a midwife, antepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, or obstetrically in a hospital, birth center, or home setting, and including normal delivery of the infant, with medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral of cases in which abnormalities develop; strong emphasis is placed on educational preparation of parents for child-bearing and child-rearing, with an orientation toward childbirth as a normal physiologic process requiring minimal intervention.
See also: doula

midwifery

The nursing speciality concerned with the conduct of antenatal care, labour and childbirth. Midwifery differs from OBSTETRICS to the extent that it is concerned primarily with the normal. Complications and undue difficulties are managed or supervised by doctors specializing in obstetrics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Owing to their unique training and deployment, midwives are often the pillars upon which universal health care coverage rests.
Midwives play an integral part in enhancing the health and well-being of women, children and families everywhere.
Amal Khiari specified that the 3,000 Tunisian midwives who work in the public and private sectors claim the regularisation of their situation and the guarantee of their legal protection.
The poll, for the Royal College of Midwives (RCM), was made up of 31% of midwives who have left the profession in the past two years and 69% who were intending to leave in the next two years.
England remains 3,500 full-time midwives short - a shortage that has now lasted for over a generation.
NZNO is one of two organisations which represent midwives, and is mainly responsible for hospital midwives.
NMBA Chair, Dr Lynette Cusack RN, said email and hard copy reminders for the 2016 renewal campaign had been updated and included helpful links to information about renewal, including a video for nurses and midwives.
As more midwives retire, the pressure on remaining staff can only increase," he added.
Her safe delivery came about thanks to the help of midwives who live and work in the community, and to the bicycle and boat ambulances provided by PWRDF and UBINIG.
Because of these practice conditions, many midwives do not have the physical and emotional support they need and are susceptible to alienation and frustration--even fatigue and burnout over time.
The College said midwives must be trusted to make decisions about the appropriate time spent with a new mother and her baby.
I was keen to find a place with good midwives, as I had heard from friends that many hospitals here do not pay attention to the choice of their midwives and do not give them a major role," she said.