middle ear

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middle ear

The middle of the three parts of the ear, consisting of an air-filled cavity bound externally by the tympanic membrane and containing three ossicles that vibrate in response to sound waves, passing the amplified sound to the inner ear at the round window.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

tym·pan·ic cav·i·ty

(tim-pan'ik kav'i-tē) [TA]
An air chamber in the temporal bone containing the ossicles; it is lined with mucous membrane and is continuous with the auditory tube anteriorly and the tympanic antrum and mastoid air cells posteriorly.

EAR

Abbreviation for estimated average requirement.

ear

(ēr) [TA]
The organ of hearing: composed of the external ear, which includes the auricle and the external acoustic, or auditory, meatus; the middle ear, or the tympanic cavity with its ossicles; and the internal ear or inner ear, or labyrinth, which includes the semicircular canals, vestibule, and cochlea.
See also: auricle
Synonym(s): auris [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

middle ear

The narrow cleft within the temporal bone lying between the inside of the ear drum and the outer wall of the inner ear. The middle ear is lined with mucous membrane, contains the chain of three auditory OSSICLES and is drained into the back of the nose by the EUSTACHIAN TUBE. It is a common site of infection, which gains access by way of the tube. Middle ear infection is called OTITIS MEDIA. Also known as the tympanic cavity.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

middle ear

see EAR.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Middle ear

The cavity or space between the eardrum and the inner ear. It includes the eardrum, the three little bones (hammer, anvil, and stirrup) that transmit sound to the inner ear, and the eustachian tube, which connects the inner ear to the nasopharynx (the back of the nose).
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

EAR

Abbreviation for estimated average requirement.

ear

(ēr) [TA]
Organ of hearing and equilibrium, composed of external ear,, consisting of auricle, external acoustic meatus, and tympanic membrane; middle ear,, or tympanic cavity, with its auditory ossicles and associated muscles; and internal ear,, the vestibulocochlear organ, which includes the bony labyrinth (of semicircular canals, vestibule, and cochlea), and vestibular and cochlear labyrinths.
Synonym(s): auris.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The studies seemed to show relationships between long periods of middle-ear fluid during children's first few years of life and various impairments of their speech, language, and learning skills and disturbances in their behavior at later ages, long after their middle-ear problems had ended and their hearing had returned to normal.
These concerns led to widespread professional endorsement of the practice of subjecting such children, after three or four months of continuous middle-ear fluid, to an operation termed myringotomy and tube insertion.
Given the concerns about developmental consequences of persistent middle-ear fluid, and given the demonstrated effectiveness of tube insertion, it is easy to understand why many professionals have advocated periodic screening of seemingly well children to detect the presence middle-ear fluid, and for those found to have fluid persisting for three months or longer, prompt surgical intervention.
Those who developed persistent middle-ear fluid within their first three years of life were randomly assigned, with parental permission, to either receive ear tubes promptly or go into a watchful waiting group that would receive tubes only if their fluid persisted for an additional specified period.
The Guideline states that tube insertion performed solely to relieve persistent middle-ear fluid "does not improve developmental outcomes in infants and toddlers who are not at risk," and that children with persistent middle-ear fluid "who are not at risk should be reexamined at three- to six-month intervals until the effusion (fluid) is no longer present, significant hearing loss is identified, or structural abnormalities of the eardrum or middle ear are suspected." In other words, for such children, don't just do something, sit there.
Neither can the findings be generalized to children with periods of middle-ear fluid longer than those we studied--nine months if fluid was present in both ears, 13 1/2 months if in only one ear--or, as indicated in the new Guideline, to the occasional child who has developed abnormalities of the eardrum or middle ear or whose fluid is consistently accompanied by moderately severe (rather than the usual mild to moderate) hearing loss.
Performance of ionomeric cement (Ionocem) in the reconstruction of the posterior meatal wall after curative middle-ear surgery.
Microline, Inc.'s, in-line microscissors offer several features for surgeons who perform middle-ear surgery.