middle class

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middle class

A country-dependent term of art broadly defined as the socioeconomic stratum between the working class and upper class. The middle class in the UK includes those who own a home and often another elsewhere (e.g., in Spain, Florida or France), go on regular holidays, have a good education and are firmly ensconced in well-paid, secure managerial or professional posts (e.g., medical doctors with the National Health Service). The upper class in the UK is comprised of aristocrats, landed gentry, and titled individuals.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"High-end" signifiers are fetishized as much by the wannabe middle classes as they are by the One Percent.
By portraying "the middle class" as a unified global "political project," this reviewer believes that we obscure how (as some of the chapters in this volume illustrate) various middle classes are often in conflict and actually constitute class "others" (22).
(2010) Neither Middling Nor Muddled: A Study of the Indian Middle Classes. Manila: Paper presented during the Workshop on Asia's Middle Class held at ADB Headquarters, on 27-28 May.
If, instead, the money were placed in the hands of the poor and middle classes, it would immediately be spent, thereby increasing production and creating jobs.
What divides these two middle classes is not how much money their members make--though the older middle class tends to be somewhat wealthier than the new--but the different degrees of effort involved in making it.
Coney and Blackpool created something new: not merely cross-class male pleasures, but the relaxed mingling of the "respectable" plebeian and the middle classes across gender lines.
The final third of the study describes both the northern and southern middle classes, naturally with more emphasis upon the latter, and the onset of the Civil War.
The urban middle classes that had expanded significantly in the early 1970s during the heady years of double-digit yearly GNP growth, known at the time as Brazil's "Economic Miracle," saw their consumption possibilities shrink as prices out-paced income and wages.
In the Ottoman case, the rise of a new middle class as a result of institutional and educational reforms, the expansion of communication networks, and the almost continuous threat to the survival of the state, created an alliance between the middle classes and state bureaucrats.
Concurrent with the rise of liberalism and the increasing spatial division of work and home, the middle classes across Europe restructured the family and its ideological underpinnings.
The current relevance of the question was emphasized in Servicing the Middle Classes: Class, Gender and Waged Domestic Labour in Contemporary Britain (London, 1994) by two sociologists, N.
Most of the thirteen chapters in the Kidd and Nicholls text have been revised from short conference papers organized around the broad theme of the history of the British middle classes since 1750.

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