microwave

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microwave

 [mi´kro-wāv]
a wave typical of electromagnetic radiation between far infrared and radiowaves.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

microwave

A 1–100 gigaHerz (109) wave on the electromagnetic spectrum with a wavelength of 1–1000 mm.

Public health
Exposure to microwaves is linked to domestic microwave ovens; leakage of infrared waves ranges from 1 milliWatt/cm2 at the time of sale of a microwave oven to 5 mW/cm2, measured at a distance of 2 inches. Older pacemakers tended to misfire when the wearer was exposed to early microwave ovens, which were also linked to an increase in cataracts.
 
Hazards
Mechanical—eggs and popcorn are particularly hazardous, as they can explode, and the microwaving of metallic objects can result in a fire hazard.
  
There is little data to suggest that microwave exposure is associated with increased morbidity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

microwave

Therapeutics Deep heat therapy The administration of electromagnetic waves that pass between electrodes placed on the Pt's skin, creating heat that ↑ blood flow and relieves muscle and joint pain
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Khandani, "Electrically tunable materials for microwave applications," Applied Physics Reviews, vol.
Their topics include designing high power microwave systems, high power microwave applications, microwave fundamentals, enabling technologies, beamless systems, relativistic magnetrons and magnetically insulated line oscillators, klystrons and reltrons, and vircators.
Measurements of complex-valued quantities are often experienced in microwave applications, such as Scattering parameter (S-parameter) and equivalent source reflection coefficient [1-4].
However, such a 3D structure is not compatible with planar microwave applications.
Via the transaction, NI will boost the capability of its products in high-frequency radio frequency (RF) and microwave applications, the buyer said.
This makes it possible for the N5247A PNA-X to be used in the widest range of microwave applications, including active device characterization and tests; device modeling; high-speed digital; and material research.
The first edition, published in 2001, was a single volume; this second edition comprises three volumes (sold individually or as a set) titled, respectively: RF and Microwave Applications and Systems; RF and Microwave Circuits, Measurements, and Modeling; and RF and Microwave Passive and Active Technologies.
The eXbase[R] rigid polypropylene film with EVOH barrier and optional PE or PP sealing layer, is particularly well suited for microwave applications. Thanks to its foam structure, which provides good insulation, the tray can be touched immediately after microwave heating without burning one's fingers in the process.
RS: With military microwave applications as opposed to commercial ones, a) you are talking about operating across a broader band, both in the communications applications as well as the electronic-warfare applications; and b) you want dual-function or multifunction capabilities from the same product.
Asked about the possible limitations of OPP, Schloesser noted, "You have to be careful with their use in microwave applications. At 325 F, OPP melts.
For RF and microwave applications, MATLAB and Simulink facilitate rapid and flexible algorithm exploration, design, and analysis while enabling unified simulation of digital, RF, and antenna elements.

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