microsurgery

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microsurgery

 [mi″kro-ser´jer-e]
dissection of minute structures under the microscope with the use of extremely small instruments. With increasingly sophisticated operating microscopes surgeons are able to perform tissue transfers without the cumbersome standard transfer procedures, such as the tubed pedicle graft and cross-leg flap, that were once necessary to ensure adequate blood supply to the grafted part. Microvascular surgery permits anastomosis of peripheral blood vessels less than 2 mm in diameter. Similarly, microneural techniques allow the surgeon to reestablish sensation by repairing or replacing severed and damaged peripheral nerves. Because of the advances in microsurgery, it is possible to reattach amputated parts, provided the health status of the patient and the condition of the amputated part are favorable.

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē),
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.

microsurgery

A surgical procedure performed with the aid of a low-power (7x to 15x) operating microscope, using special equipment, surgical thread, clamps, and scalpels, to repair severed blood vessels, nerves or other structures. While it is primarily used in plastic surgery, microsurgical techniques are being incorporated into most other fields of surgery and may become linked with robotic surgery.

microsurgery

Surgery A surgical procedure performed with the aid of a low-power–7x to 15x microscope, using special equipment, surgical thread, clamps, scalpels, to repair severed blood vessels or nerves or other structures. See Free flap microsurgery, Laryngeal microsurgery.

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.

microsurgery

Surgery in which the operation field is magnified 2 to about 40 times by means of an operating microscope. Appropriately miniaturized operating instruments are used. This method allows a high degree of precision in the cutting, approximation and stitching (suturing) of small parts and is widely used by ophthalmologists, ENT surgeons and vascular surgeons. To a lesser extent, microsurgery is employed in gynaecology and urology.

Microsurgery

Surgery on small body structures or cells performed with the aid of a microscope and other specialized instruments.
Mentioned in: General Surgery

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.
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We have four surgeons in the service who do microvascular surgery and two other head and neck surgeons.
Key Words: microvascular surgery, free flaps, milrinone, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, vasospasm
One-hundred patients, aged 18 to 82 years, scheduled for elective free flap microvascular surgery were recruited.
These are qualities that may be beneficial in microvascular surgery (6).
Atlas of Microvascular Surgery: Anatomy and Operative Technique.
of Oklahoma School of Medicine) present a revised and expanded edition of their atlas of head and neck surgery, adding three new chapters covering such topics as microvascular surgery, endoscopic sinus surgery, and skull base surgery.
His research revolved around gastrointestinal transplantation, the treatment of massive obesity by surgery, metabolic and nutritional management of the short gut syndrome and microvascular surgery.
New techniques, particularly in the area of microvascular surgery, have recently revolutionized aspects of the management of post-traumatic thumb reconstruction.
The study examined the progress over five years of 25 patients with foot ulcers who had undergone microvascular surgery. In that procedure, the damaged tissue in the heel of the foot was replaced with tissue from the patient's back, and circulation was restored to the heel.
During the first decade of microvascular surgery, the focus was on developing techniques that would increase the survival of free flaps.
Microvascular surgery in reconstruction of head and neck defects can be rewarding when appropriately planned and executed.
Microvascular surgery has revolutionized the care of patients with partial and complete digital amputations.