microreactor

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microreactor

A device that hosts a nanoscale reaction in which reactants meet substrates in the narrowest (capillary) scale.

Pros
Increased efficiency, reaction speed and yield; safety, reliability, scalability, on-site/on-demand production, improved process control.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The enzyme catalysed acetic anhydride hydrolysis, and subsequent esterification with isoamyl alcohol was conducted in a microreaction platform.
Their extraction from spectra proceeded straightforward using the in-line and on-line monitoring at the microreaction assembly.
The mineral precipitation is preceded by a self-adaptive microreaction environment caused by enzymatic action.
Microchannels are gradually used in microreactor systems with microreaction technology, where a typical application includes liquid-liquid multiphase flows.
With regard to the geometry of the packaging, the "T"-shaped chip was easy to handle, and the microreaction chamber created was suitable for the hybridization and detection steps.
These techniques have been exploited in creating microreaction cells, microarrays, and microchips, which all share common advantages, e.g., smaller analysis volumes, smaller volumes of reagents consumed and waste produced, cost-effectiveness, increased number of analyses per volume unit, and faster analysis.
In the current miniaturization trend, four main types of microminiature analytical devices are emerging: (a) high-density arrays of microreaction wells, (b) surface microarrays of reagents, (c) microchips, and (d) nanochips.
Aliquot stocks of suitable sizes are predispensed into microreaction vessels and are subsequently frozen for storage.
A microreaction purge vessel coupled with a condenser and heating jackets permitted introduction of the sample directly into the reduction solution via a gas-tight syringe (Hamilton, Reno, NV).
500 pmol) were injected into the microreaction purge vessel containing 5 mL of reducing agent solution, and the quantity of produced NO was measured after conversion by each reducing agent at 20 [degrees]C for N[O.sub.2.sup.-] and at 80 [degrees]C for N[O.sub.3].
The data suggest that individual microreactions mitigate the impact of inhibitors on PCR amplification by retaining discernible positive signals even when moderate PCR inhibition is occurring in a droplet.
Uses are in droplet generation, reagent dispensing, cell manipulation, microreactions, and any application where precise control over fluid flow is required.