microinequity

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microinequity

Any of the factors which frustrate equal opportunities for job promotions and career advancement, based on a person’s gender, race, age, weight or other "outsider" status. 

The term was coined by Mary Rowe of MIT for any small, everyday inequity through which individuals are often treated differently; multiple microinequities may accumulate to create more severe discrimination.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There must be a willingness to challenge unintentional and intentional biases that promote microinequities and act as a barrier to the achievement of diversity.
* Microaggressions and microinequities: "In a Detroit suburb two women stood for 15 minutes while a real estate agent printed out listings for them.
Specifically, "Microinequities are the subtle putdowns, snubs, dismissive gestures, or sarcastic tones that can undercut employee performance and encourage employee turnover" (Cherng and Tate 2007, 1).
"The kingdom has not yet come": Goping with microinequities within a Christian university.
Kelly Lendsay of the Aboriginal Human Resource Council said stereotyping of Aboriginal peoples often takes the form of "microinequities." These are subtle forms of racism; small, but the cumulative effects can result in exclusion or the limiting of opportunities for Aboriginal people.
Microinequities: When small slights lead to huge problems in the workplace.
Other terms used to describe subtle gender discriminatory events or their collective effects include chilly climate, microaggressions, microinequities, and selective incivility.
It wasn't until someone leaned over to him one day in a meeting and said, "I am so tired of her microinequities." He realized then that he was not alone in receiving the undercurrent messages his manager was sending out.
Relatedly, Mary Rowe coined the term "microinequities" to refer to the kinds of subtle behaviors that might appear inconsequential when taken alone (as cited in Sadker & Sadker, 1994).
Deborah Dagit, who is our Executive Director of Diversity & Work Life, has implemented several significant processes and programs in the organization; for example, she sponsored a program called Microinequities, where employees can learn about all the ways in which we communicate powerful nonverbal messages, and how to be conscious of the messages we send, receive, and observe that impact inclusion and teamwork.
The whole union war, Hoerr emphasizes, was fought on what were then dismissed as trivial matters, "the minutiae of discrimination," or "microinequities" having to do with quality of life.
As the following excerpts reflect, these negative tendencies can include stereotyping, differential organizational socialization, subtle bias, microinequities, and declining organizational communication effectiveness, and they can lead to employee perceptions of communicative and interpersonal inequity in the workplace: