microcystin


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microcystin

(mī-krō-sis'tin),
Those compounds produced by Microcystis aeruginosa: potent hepatotoxins and probable tumor promoters.

microcystin

Any toxic, cyclic, non-ribosomal peptide produced by cyanobacteria, which has anticholinesterase activity or causes severe liver injury through DNA damage by activating endonucleases and inhibiting inhibit protein phosphatases types 1 and 2A. Topical exposure to microcystins causes skin and eye irritation, rhinorrhoea, vertigo and fatigue; parenteral exposure may cause death after initial exposure, often due to intrahepatic haemorrhage and hypovolemic shock. An epidemic of microcystin-related death occurred at a haemodialysis centre in Brazil due to impure water.
References in periodicals archive ?
The concentration found in this study represents 1000 times greater than the permissible limit for microcystin drinking water [44].
Microcystin contamination in fish from the Jacarepagua Lagoon (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil): ecological implication and human health risk.
After examination of the fish, LDWF staff speculated the emaciation was caused by increased levels of domoic acid and microcystin in the diet of the fish though this was never verified (pers.
(2003) found that production of higher amounts of the bioactive toxin, microcystin by cyanobacteria was favored at temperature more than 23[degrees]C, although maximum cylindrosperopsinproduction was attained by the cyanobacterium Cylindros permopsis raciborskii at 20[degrees]C (Griffiths and Saker, 2003).
* Algae toxins--The Toledo Blade reported that a Lake Erie algal bloom producing microcystin toxins is one of the largest in history.
Microcystin (MC) is a hepatotoxin produced by some species of cyanobacteria such as Microcystis aeruginosa.
Researchers at Morro Bay, Calif., two summers ago noted that sea otters in the saltwater bay inexplicably began dying of a freshwater toxin, microcystin, the same one OSU scientists found riding Oregon rivers.
Here's a simple analogy: I live in the Toledo, Ohio, area where, in the summer of 2014, algae blooms contaminated Lake Erie with a toxin called microcystin that can cause liver failure.
In vivo phycocyanin flourometry as a potential rapid screening toolfor predicting elevated microcystin concentrations at eutrophic lakes.
In this series of 26 cases, samples of the suspected seafood in 21 cases were tested by the CDC or the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as negative for the following known aquatic toxins: ciguatoxin, saxitoxin, brevetoxin, tetrodotoxin, palytoxin, domoic acid, okadaic acid, and two blue-green algal or cyanobacterial toxins (microcystin and nodularin).
Some of the algae observed in the VSP and the GBL could be cayanobacterial, which may present with microcystin, a known hepatotoxin (Anderson, 2007; Dash et al., 2013; Falconer and Humpage, 2005; and Metcalf and Codd, 2004).
Toledo officials warned residents not to use city water early Saturday after tests at one treatment plant showed readings for microcystin above the standard for consumption, most likely because of the algae.