Australia

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Australia,

a continent commonly referred to as "the land down under."
Australian antigen - hepatitis B antigen first identified in serum of Australian aborigines.
Australian Q fever - acute rickettsial infection transmitted by ticks and caused by Coxiella burnetii, most often found in Australian bandicoots.
Australian X disease - Synonym(s): Murray Valley encephalitis
Australian X disease virus - Synonym(s): Murray Valley virus
Australian X encephalitis - Synonym(s): Murray Valley encephalitis
References in periodicals archive ?
(http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ngeo1736.html#/affil-auth) "A Precambrian microcontinent in the Indian Ocean." Nature Geoscience published online 24 February 2013.
Fatka and Mergl provide an overview of the complex evolution of terrane terminology, and argue, largely on the basis of faunal evidence, for the existence of Perunica as a microcontinent that is separate from the Armorican Terrane Assemblage throughout the Ordovician.
Significance of fossiliferous Middle Cambrian rocks of Rhode Island to the history of the Avalonian microcontinent. Geology, 6, pp.
England and Thompson 1986), it is possible that some of these backarcs may have inherited the high heat flow from a recent history of extension (from which the heat has yet to dissipate) and switched to compression by the arrival of a microcontinent or oceanic plateau at the subduction zone.
The complex history of the Appalachian orogen can be summarized in terms of processes related to the Palaeozoic closure of the Iapetus and Rheic oceans, which led to the accretion of arcs, back arcs, and microcontinents to Laurentia (e.g., van Staal et al.
The first three orogenic events are mainly the result of the successive arrival of four microcontinents (Dashwoods, Ganderia, Avalonia and Meguma) at the Laurentian margin (Fig.
The Caledonia terrane and Brookville/New River terranes are considered to be part of the peri-Gondwanan microcontinents of Avalonia and Ganderia, respectively (van Staal et al.
The orogenies of the New England Appalachians resulted from the collision of several microcontinents to the Laurentian margin.