Micrococcus


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Related to Micrococcus: staphylococcus, streptococcus

Micrococcus

 [mi″kro-kok´us]
a genus of gram-positive bacteria of the family Micrococcaceae, usually found in soil, water, dust, or dairy products.

micrococcus

 [mi″kro-kok´us] (Gr.)
1. any organism of the genus Micrococcus.
2. a very small, spherical microorganism.

Micrococcus

(mī'krō-kok'kŭs),
A genus of bacteria (family Micrococcaceae) containing gram-positive, spheric cells that occur in irregular masses. Some species are motile or produce motile mutants. These organisms are saprophytic, facultatively parasitic, or parasitic but are not truly pathogenic. The type species is Micrococcus luteus. It is the type genus of the family Micrococcaceae.
[micro- + G. kokkos, berry]

mi·cro·coc·cus

, pl.

mi·cro·coc·ci

(mī'krō-kok'kŭs, -kok'sī),
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Micrococcus.

Micrococcus

/Mi·cro·coc·cus/ (-kok´us) a genus of gram-positive bacteria (family Micrococcaceae) found in soil, water, etc.

micrococcus

/mi·cro·coc·cus/ (-kok´us) pl. micrococ´ci  
1. an organism of the genus Micrococcus.
2. a very small spherical microorganism.

micrococcus

(mī′krō-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. micro·cocci (-kŏk′sī′, -kŏk′ī′)
Any of various spherical, aerobic, gram-positive bacteria of the genus Micrococcus that are usually nonmotile and occur in pairs, tetrads, or irregular clusters.

mi′cro·coc′cal (-kŏk′əl) adj.

Mi·cro·coc·cus

(mī'krō-kok'ŭs)
A bacterial genus of Micrococcaceae containing gram-positive, spheric cells that occur in irregular masses, never in packets. Some species are motile or produce motile mutants. These organisms are saprophytic, facultatively parasitic, or parasitic but are not truly pathogenic. The type species is M. luteus.
[micro- + G. kokkos, berry]

mi·cro·coc·cus

, pl. micrococci (mī'krō-kok'ŭs, -si)
A vernacular usage for any member of the genus Micrococcus.

Micrococcus

a genus of gram-positive coccoid bacteria of the family Micrococcaceae found in soil, water, etc.

micrococcus

pl. micrococci [Gr.] any organism of the genus Micrococcus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antimicrobial activity of the representative strains Strain Antimicrobial activity number Salmonella enterica Escherichia coli Micrococcus luteus ATCC [43971.
lectularius, including Stenotrophomonas, Enterobacter, Bacillus, Staphylococcus, Arthrobacter, and Micrococcus (Reinhardt et al.
Using them the researchers demonstrated that phenolic compounds in the onion prevent the development of bacteria such as Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Listeria monocytogenes, microorganisms typically associated with the deterioration of foods.
There are bacteria capable of oxidising hydrocarbons in the most widely spread genera of Arthrobacter, Acinetobacter, Pseudimonas, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Mycobacterium, Micrococcus and Rhodococcus.
8[degrees]C) Clinical conditions Subsequently other diagnosed with ITP, than bacteremia Paracoccus yeei and Micrococcus luteus bacteremia Treatment (duration) Imipenem (21 d) * CRP, C-reactive protein (reference range <5 mg/L); IVDA, intravenous drug abuse; TIPS, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt; ITP, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura; IV, intravenous.
Os microrganismos conhecidos como autoctones sao aqueles que existem antes de qualquer tratamento ou processamento, pertencendo a este grupo os generos Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Flavobacterium, Micrococcus e Bacillus, como microrganismos autoctones de aguas minerais.
They plate them out on 35cm glass plates of Iso-Sensitest Agar seeded with Micrococcus luteus.
Due to numerous shared characteristics, Rhodococcus is commonly misidentified as diphtheroid contaminant and normal flora, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Bacillus, Micrococcus organisms or even fungi (6).
Twenty vials were inoculated with a variety of bacteria including Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Yersinia at a level of 5000-20,000 cfu/g.
Emerging pathogens include species of Enterococcus, Micrococcus, Achromobacter, nontuberculous mycobacteria and other fungal organisms.