microclimate

(redirected from Microclimates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

microclimate

the immediate climate in which an organism lives, such as the climate around a leaf, within the herb layer, or within an adjacent part of the soil.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Urban Microclimate as Artifact: Towards an Architectural Theory of Thermal Diversity
In the metropolises and densely populated areas, one of the important functions of vegetation is to improve the urban microclimate. Vegetation mainly affects the microclimate in various ways was, including shading, controlling the humidity and wind break (Ali-Touder 2005; McPherson 1994).
However, the impact of countermeasures by urban design on urban thermal comfort cannot be described sufficiently by simple microclimate factors, such as surface or air temperature.
This study was aimed to study the effects of planting pattern and irrigation on the farmland microclimate, and indentify possible ways to improve the yield of winter wheat.
The most valuable aspect of attending a seed swap may actually be the chance to glean local wisdom about what works--or doesn't work--in your shared gardening microclimate. To find a seed swap near you, check with local gardening clubs and food co-ops.
Rather than analyse the weather and topography of large swathes of land, the new system divides fields into smaller microclimates that guide farmers on the best way to work each individual plot.
The final section comprises two case studies of conditions facing microclimates in locations that are sufficiently different in climate and require different forms of intervention.
With numerous microclimates it too produces a wide range of wine styles.
Its varied landscapes give rise to innumerable microclimates and almost half the island is classified as a World Biosphere Reserve.
'Our findings show that more diverse landscapes may provide a greater range of resources and microclimates, which can buffer insect populations from declines in difficult years,' said co-author Jane Hill of the University of York.
The study found that the maximum energy savings possible in the payback period was 23 percent in Chicago, 21.5 percent in Baltimore, and 15.8 percent in Newport Beach, CA; however, several low-cost, no-cost, and cost-saving options to reduce energy consumption were omitted from the study, including changing the geometry of the building, adjusting glazing for building orientation, installing operable windows, shading with trees, and altering the building to meet microclimates.