microchimerism

mi·cro·chim·er·ism

(mī'krō-kim'ĕr-izm),
1. The presence of donor cells in a graft recipient.
2. The presence of fetal cells in maternal circulation or of maternal cells in offspring.

microchimerism

A genetic hybrid caused by migration of cells from an allograft into recipient tissue.

mi·cro·chim·er·ism

(mī'krō-kim'ĕr-izm)
The presence of donor cells in a graft recipient, or of fetal cells remaining in maternal circulation, which can be detected by molecular methods but not by flow cytometry.

microchimerism

(mī″krō-kī-mĭr′ĭ-zĭm, kī′mĭ-rĭz″ĭm) [″ + ″]
The presence in a tissue of some cells of alien origin, e.g., of fetal cells in a pregnant woman's bloodstream.
References in periodicals archive ?
In comparison, PCR-free WGS requires more cost and effort but is more complete in its coverage and is generalizable across the whole organism (we'll pretend this space wasn't just recently devoted to somatic microchimerism as the exception to this).
Amongst endogenous factors for the disease development, the attention is focused predominantly on female sex, pregnancy with postpartum period and fetal microchimerism. Environmental factors influencing HT development are iodine intake, drugs, infections and different chemicals.
Lee Nelson, Fetal Microchimerism in Women with Breast Cancer, 67 Cancer Res.
The detection of genomic chimerism, [greater than or equal to] 2 cell populations from differing genetic origins within an individual, has diverse clinical applications including identifying fetal microchimerism in autoimmune diseases (1), graft injury and transplant rejection (2, 3), and the clinical management of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) [2] patients.
Preterm cord blood was characterized by a population of central memory cells with a type 1 T helper phenotype, which was not seen in term infants, and by an increase in maternal microchimerism. Compared with term infants, T cells from preterm infants mounted a robust proliferative, proinflammatory response to maternal antigens, but did not respond to third-party antigens.
It also allows a unique exchange of cells between mother and child, known as "microchimerism." The research team looked at how malaria can alter the mother-child cell sharing that occurs during pregnancy.
Khosrotehrani, "Distant mesenchymal progenitors contribute to skin wound healing and produce collagen: evidence from a murine fetal microchimerism model," PLoS One, vol.
Microchimerism, caused by class II HLA compatibility, may be involved in the pathogenesis of scleroderma [24].
Clark et al., "Pregnancy-induced maternal regulatory T cells, bona fide memory or maintenance by antigenic reminder from fetal cell microchimerism?," Chimerism, vol.
However, the use of these cells theoretically carries risks such as animal cell transplantation, infection, rejection, and microchimerism. Therefore, it is not typically preferred for clinical applications.
No evidence for maternal-fetal microchimerism in infantile hemangioma: a molecular genetics investigation.