cantilever

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cantilever

/can·ti·le·ver/ (kan″tĭ-le´ver) a projecting structure supported on only one end and carrying a load at the other end or along its length.
References in periodicals archive ?
Loui A, Goericke FT, Ratto TV, Lee J, Hart BR, King WP (2008) The effect of piezoresistive microcantilever geometry on cantilever sensitivity during surface stress chemical sensing.
The scientists equipped their microcantilevers like the antennae.
Every few hours, this droplet was subjected to a deformation experiment via the microcantilever apparatus described above.
Protiveris proprietary biochips utilize arrays of microcantilevers to perform advanced biological and chemical research.
With this new approach, when the microcantilever stops oscillating we know with high certainty that the target chemical or compound is present," Lavrik said.
The microcantilever arrays are each coated with substances that stick to the HIV and other proteins, which are markers associated with disease progression.
The probe, a silicon microcantilever with a specialized tip, is excited mechanically, electrically, or magnetically through microscope electronics coupled to an appropriate transducer.
One marketable product that works on that scale which has achieved a level of success is the microcantilever sensor.
20) Commercial silicon microcantilever probes were used that had manufacturer's values of probe tip radius and probe spring constant in the ranges of 5-10 nm and 20-100 N/m, respectively.
As an alternative to the strictly enzyme based PSA test, mechanical engineer Arun Majumdar and his colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley measured PSA in blood by using a chip mounted with a microcantilever that's gold-plated on one side.
For the method to work properly and yield accurate images that show features on the scale of nanometers, the microcantilever tip should always oscillate the same way, nice and smoothly like clockwork.
But as the Hitchhiker's Guide entertains, it also intrigues, with its aerial view photography of capillary trenchs, cell-sorting sieves, fluidic reservoirs, microcantilever diving boards, and very tiny thermocyclers.