microorganism

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microorganism

 [mi″kro-or´gah-nizm]
a microscopic organism; those of medical interest include bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Viruses are often classified as microorganisms, although they are sometimes excluded because they are not cellular and they are unable to replicate without a host cell.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'gan-izm),
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

/mi·cro·or·gan·ism/ (-or´gah-nizm) a microscopic organism; those of medical interest include bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Viruses are often included, but are sometimes excluded because they are not cellular and are unable to replicate without a host cell.

microorganism

[-ôr′gəniz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, mikros + organon, instrument
any tiny, usually microscopic entity capable of carrying on living processes. It may be pathogenic. Kinds of microorganisms include bacteria, fungi, protozoan, and viruses.

microorganism

An organism detected by microscopy—e.g., viruses, bacteria, fungi and intracellular parasites (protozoans).

microorganism

 A organism detected by microscopy–eg, viruses, bacteria, fungi and intracellular parasites–protozoans; bug

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'găn-izm)
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

or

microbe

any microscopic organism such as a BACTERIUM, FUNGUS, PROTOZOAN, microscopicALGA or member of the ARCHAEA.

Microorganism

An organism (life form) that is too small to be seen with the naked eye.

microorganism

; MO generic term denoting bacteria, fungi, rickettsiae and viruses

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī'krō-ōr'găn-izm)
A microscopic organism (plant or animal).

microorganism

(mī´krō ōr´gənizəm),
n a microscopic living organism, such as a bacterium, virus, rickettsia, yeast, or fungus. These may exist as part of the normal flora of the oral cavity without producing disease. With disturbance of the more or less balanced interrelationship among the organisms or between the organisms and host resistance, individual forms may overgrow and induce disease in the host's tissues. Those foreign to the individual may invade and produce pathologic processes.

microorganism

a microscopic organism; those of veterinary interest include bacteria, rickettsiae, viruses, fungi and protozoa.
References in periodicals archive ?
We know the micro-organisms in the soil have to do this efficiently, or they will die, and we believe we can learn a great deal from nature to determine which proteins are the most efficient and effective in degradation.
Micro-organisms are single cell plants capable of surviving under adverse conditions and when active can multiply with incredible speed.
recombinant) using transformed micro-organisms or cell cultures.
The aerobiology of the micro-organism is important to understand because it plays an important role in the transmission of the disease.
3 the primary conditions for successful protection from damaging micro-organisms are listed.
On a smaller scale, evolution is at the heart of the adaptation process for many species, in particular micro-organisms (e.
Byotrol products have a four stage effect on micro-organisms using changes in surface tension as the basis of their attack.
But he added: "Data from the comet seems to unequivocally point to micro-organisms being involved.
Beneficial micro-organisms have since been shown to inhabit three main locations in the digestive tract: the stomach, the lower part of the small intestine and the large intestine.
You can use micro-organisms to break down cellulose in order to make ethanol for biofuels, or in medicine, you could find micro-organisms that generate anti-microbial agents, which could be used as thermo-stable antibiotics.
Washington, May 4 ( ANI ): Scientists are concerned about invaders to Mars in the form of micro-organisms from Earth.
AnMBR involves anaerobic micro-organisms that are able to live in environments devoid of oxygen, such as sediment layers on floors of lakes, dams and the ocean.