Mexican tea

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che·no·po·di·um

(kē'nō-pō'dē-ŭm),
The dried ripe fruit of Chenopodium ambrosoides (family Chenopodiaceae), American wormwood, from which a volatile oil is distilled and formerly used as an anthelmintic.
Synonym(s): Jesuits' tea, Mexican tea, wormseed (2)
[G. chēn, goose, + pous (pod-), foot]

Mexican tea

n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The event was held as part of "Mexican Night" organized by the Mexican Embassy in Azerbaijan and M'EAT restaurant, Azertag reported.
Addressing a press conference at the InterContinental Hotel, Ambassador Miranda said: "The Mexican cuisine is central to the cultural identity of whole communities that practice and transmit it from generation to generation.
We have seen a dramatic rise in Mexican restaurants since our opening eight years ago.
Since Mexican Americans make up the majority of this Latino population, there is renewed interest in the history and influence of Mexican Americans in the US political economy.
The "defense centers" were "specifically designed to provide consular assistance as well as legal representation to all Mexican migrants who require support in America," Mexico's Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray said in a statement. The centers will help the roughly 5.8 million undocumented Mexicans living in the U.S.
In Steel Barrio: The Great Mexican Migration to South Chicago, 1915-1940, historian Michael Innis-Jimenez chronicles the making of Chicago as a hub for Mexican immigration during the first half of the 20th century.
Best Mexican Beach Pebbles recommends that people interested in various pebble stone projects first use their new website to learn about landscaping pebble uses, colors and sizes.
"Minorities, especially the growing population of Mexican Americans, are poised to fill the white-collar positions vacated by baby boomers, making it critical to take a closer look at the mobility paths and challenges faced by those who succeed," says Vallejo, assistant professor of sociology at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
In Mexico, "Mexican" signified national identity and could encompass multiple racial groups (even the Indios borbaros were technically Mexican nationals).
Positive Crossroads: Mexican Consular Assistance and Immigrant Integration highlights programs in 10 of these cities that support education, health, financial literacy, youth development and recreation for Mexican citizens living in the U.S.
Mexican banks are expanding into the US to service Mexicans settled in the country.
Claiming Rights and Righting Wrongs in Texas: Mexican Workers and Job Politics during World War II.