mass

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mass

 [mas]
1. a lump or collection of cohering particles.
2. that characteristic of matter that gives it inertia. Symbol m.
atomic mass atomic weight; see also atomic mass unit.
inner cell mass an internal cluster of cells at the embryonic pole of the blastocyst which develops into the body of the embryo.
lean body mass that part of the body including all its components except neutral storage lipid; in essence, the fat-free mass of the body.
relative molecular mass technically preferable term for molecular weight.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

MASS

(mas),
Acronym for mitral valve prolapse, aortic anomalies, skeletal changes, and skin changes. See: MASS syndrome.

mass (m),

(mas),
1. A lump or aggregation of coherent material. Synonym(s): massa [TA]
2. pharmacotherapy a soft solid preparation containing an active medicinal agent of such consistency that it can be divided into small pieces and rolled into pills.
3. One of the seven fundamental quantities in the SI; its unit is the kilogram, defined as the mass of the international prototype of the kilogram, which is made of platinum-iridium and maintained at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures.
4. The quantity of matter in a body or substance.
5. In pulmonary radiology, a lung or pleural lesion larger than 30 mm in diameter, as inferred from an opacity on the x-ray image; most often a neoplasm.
6. Commonly used as a synonym for tumor or neoplasm.
[L. massa, a doughlike mass]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mass

(măs)
n.
1. A lump or aggregate of coherent material: a cancerous mass.
2. Pharmacology A thick, pasty mixture containing drugs from which pills are formed.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mass

Pathology
A circumscribed or relatively circumscribed aggregate of tissue, generally understood to have been identified by an imaging procedure, the nature of which (i.e., benign or malignant) is as yet unknown.

Physical exam
An aggregate of tissue with a different consistency than is normal for a particular body region.
 
Science-speak
A cohesive aggregate of often similar components, composition, cells or molecules; the amount of matter contained in a body.

MASS

Multicentre Aneurysm Screening Study. A randomised controlled study that assessed the effect of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening on mortality in men.

Conclusion
Mortality from AAA in the cohort that had been screened was half that of those who had not been screened.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mass

A cohesive aggregate of often similar components, composition, cells or molecules; the amount of matter contained in a body. See Biomass, Critical mass Physical exam An aggregate of tissue with a different consistency than is normal for a particular body region. See Breast mass.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

MASS

(măs)
1. An acronym proposed by the American Medical Association, to assist in triage in mass-casualty incidents. The components of the acronym are M for move, A for assess, S for sort, and S for send.
2. An acronym for syndrome manifesting mitral valve prolapse, aortic anomalies, skeletal changes, and skin changes.

mass

(mas)
1. A lump or aggregation of coherent material.
2. pharmacy A soft but solid preparation containing an active medicinal agent, of such consistency that it can be divided into small pieces and rolled into pills.
3. One of the seven fundamental quantities in the SI; its unit is the kilogram (kg), defined as the mass of the international prototype of the kilogram, which is made of platinum-iridium and kept at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures.
Synonym(s): massa.
[L. massa, a doughlike mass]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mass

A fundamental property of a quantity of substance related to the amount of matter present. Mass is not the same as weight, which is the force acting on a mass as a result of gravitation.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Patient discussion about mass

Q. A lump in my armpit Hi, Last week after the shower I found a small painful lump in my right groin. I went to see a doctor and he prescribed me some antibiotics. I’ve been taking it for 5 days and the lump is still there. I’m 31, usually healthy and work-out in the gym regularly, don’t smoke or use drugs and don’t take any medications. Is that dangerous? Should I go and see another doctor?

A. What you describe sounds like enlarged lymph node. The first diagnosis that’s suspected in such case is an infection that makes it painful. The antibiotics you take need several more days to act, so currently it doesn’t sound suspicious. If the lump persist, it’d be wise to consult you doctor

Q. what is the regular body mass for a five three 11 year old

A. Here is a website that can help you calculate your childs body mass index(BMI). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Body_mass_index

You cant always go by what those charts say though, because according to them I am overwieght. I'm 5'10 and I weigh 176 lbs and i am far from overweight. I would say that as long as your child is healthy and you can see that your childs weight isn't causing them problems then all is well. Hope this helps.

Q. What are the different type of breast lumps... what are the different type of breast lumps being confused by many as breast cancer and what are their symptoms?

A. Lumps i.e. the thickened area are formed when the tissues of the breast undergoes some changes. These changes are of two types that is benign (non-cancerous) conditions or cancer. A benign breast condition can be mistaken as cancer. Most of benign symptoms are the same as those seen in breast cancer but a cancer will be hard and a firm solid lump. Common type of lumps are:

1) General lump – which are like nodules and they may come and go soon.
2) Abscess lump – also called cyst are fluid fill sacs and may be due to infection.
3) Adenomas – abnormal growth of tissues, like fibroadenomas , it’s a benign tumor.
4) Atypical hyperplasia – fast growing abnormal cells
5) Blood clots – some time blood clot in the vein is mistaken for lumps and as cancer even.

More discussions about mass
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References in periodicals archive ?
For an alternative IaaS instance [I.sub.i], it is assumed that [I.sub.i] has k important nonfunctional metrics that are expressed as [x.sub.i1], [x.sub.i2], ..., [x.sub.ik], and the metric weight vector obtained by the combination weighting method is w = ([w.sub.1], [w.sub.2], ..., [w.sub.k]); thus, the comprehensive evaluation [U.sub.i] of [I.sub.i] can be obtained by formula (8).
Place an empty 2-liter bottle on one side of the balance, and use metric weights to find its mass.
Nesno will be a rival to North-East Against a Regional Assembly, led by metric weights campaigner Neil Herron.
Compared to the amount of publicity and easy-to-use conversion tables that were available during the transfer to decimal coinage 30 years ago, the Government's efforts to ease us into metric weights and measures has been quite derisory.
My criticism centred on the use of a publicity stunt to gain popularity and the mocking of legislation in the use of metric weights.
The EC officials hate British racing because they can't think of any way to impose their own regulations on it - such as metric weights and distances, decimalisation of odds and Barry Cope's prawns to be subject to measurement by fat inspectors from Strasbourg.
Mr Herron, who shot to prominence in a fight by Sunderland traders against the EU's insistence on metric weights and measures, said: "The message is simply that I am not prepared to accept governance from Brussels and I am aware that the vast majority of the British public feel the way I do."
Metrication has been a consistent aspect of UK policy since the Metric Weights and Measures Act of 1864, long before the UK joined the EEC back in 1973.
They mean that traders in loose goods sold by weight, such as meat and fish, fruit and vegetables, must indicate prices in metric measures, (and in imperial measures if they wish), and must use metric weights as well.
Going metric was OK money wise - the USA is metric but still retains lbs and ounces, miles, gallons - but the cost to this country going metric weights and measures was just too costly, particularly to the small trader.
SUPERMARKET chains in Scotland have refused to follow the lead of rivals Tesco and dump metric weights for old-fashioned pounds and ounces.