pentylenetetrazol

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Related to Metrazol: metrazol shock therapy

pen·ty·lene·tet·ra·zol

(pen'ti-lēn-tet'ră-zol),
A powerful CNS stimulant; has been used to cause generalized convulsion in the shock treatment of emotional states and as a respiratory stimulant; mainly used in experimental studies of seizure mechanisms and the search for new anticonvulsant drugs.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pentylenetetrazol

(pĕn′tə-lēn′tĕt′rə-zôl′, -zōl′, -zŏl′)
n.
A drug, C6H10N4, that is a central nervous system and respiratory stimulant, used experimentally primarily to induce seizures for pharmaceutical research.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zelda is a tragic figure, her death is an unsolved mystery, and Highland is a perfect setting for lust among the lost with the horrors of Metrazol giving it a Gothic edge.
Quinn Rossander, from the Delaware Mental Health Consumer Coalition, later wrote that from that point on: "Electric shock treatment quickly replaced insulin and Metrazol as the favourite form of shock treatment, and became the most effective method of controlling troublesome asylum inmates."
The Howard building came to represent a century of incurable degeneracies, as well as a century of violent "therapies" that took place in the building: arsenic, insulin, and metrazol "therapies," electroconvulsive shock, and lobotomies were all performed on site in the first half of the twentieth century (Fisher, 2000, pp.
The poem describes some of Solomon's exploits: who threw potato salad at CCNY lecturers on Dadaism and subsequently presented themselves on the granite steps of the madhouse with shaven heads and harlequin speech of suicide, demanding instantaneous lobotomy, and who were given instead the concrete void of insulin Metrazol electricity hydrotherapy psychotherapy occupational therapy pingpong and amnesia, (I.
(2) With this in mind, Meduna set out to find a chemical method of inducing seizures, first using camphor and later metrazol. Meduna reported improvement in 50% of patients who received metrazol at seizure-producing doses.