trichloroethane

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tri·chlor·o·eth·ane

(trī-klōr'ō-eth'ān),
An industrial solvent with pronounced inhalation anesthetic activity.
Synonym(s): methylchloroform
References in periodicals archive ?
For most applications, laboratory studies suggest that heptane is the best all-around alternative to methyl chloroform: however, for specialized applications, hexane, toluene or xylene may provide optimum results.
For example, because heptane and the other solvents evaporate more slowly than Freon and methyl chloroform, using them as dispersion carriers may require longer oven times for drying.
With the phaseout of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (also known as 1,1,1-tri or methyl chloroform) accelerated to Dec 31, 1995, manufacturers are more concerned than ever about finding alternative surface cleaning systems that are environmentally acceptable, safe to use, and effective.
European Regulation Montreal Protocol -50% 1 January 1993 -50% 1 January 1995 -85% 1 July 1995 -85% 1 January 1997 -100% 1 July 1997 -100% 1 January 2000 Methyl chloroform (based on 1989 levels)
Designed to tougher European standards, the closed-top vapor degreasing equipment from Durr Industries is said to reduce solvent emissions by up to 99% when using chlorinated solvents such as methyl chloroform, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and methylene chloride.
The phase-out of CFC-113 and methyl chloroform for use as cleaning solvents is still challenging the industry to find alternatives.
* completing a phaseout of CFCs and a freeze on methyl chloroform, both of which add to global warming and destroy stratospheric ozone.
But they also discovered that the annual rates of increase for all of the measured gases, which also include methane, nitrous oxide, methyl chloroform and carbon tetrachloride, have slowed in the last five years.
The other ODS that have already been phased out in the country include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) 11, 12, 113, 114, halon 1301 and 1211, carbon tetrachloride and methyl chloroforms.
Substances that have been phased out as of January 1, 2010 -- mostly ahead of target schedule -- are chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons, carbon tetrachlorides (CTCs), methyl chloroforms (MCs), non-quarantine and pre-shipment methyl bromides (MBs).