methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

(redirected from Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus)

methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

A bacterium with multiple antibiotic resistances: e.g., aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, rifampin, tetracycline, streptomycin, cephalosporin. Some strains of MRSA have reduced sensitivity to antiseptics.

Treatment
Vancomycin.

methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Methicillin-aminoglycoside resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA An organism with multiple antibiotic resistances–eg, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, rifampin, tetracycline, streptomycin, cephalosporin; some strains of MRSA have ↓ sensitivity to antiseptics Treatment Vancomycin. See Antibiotic resistance.

methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Abbreviation: MRSA
A strain of S. aureus resistant to methicillin. MRSA is resistant to all penicillins. Patients with MRSA infections should be isolated; appropriate mask-gown-glove precautions must be used, depending on the site of the infection. MRSA is an important cause of health care associated infections. Handwashing is essential in caring for patients who harbor this organism. See: isolation; resistance, antibiotic

MRSA is resistant to most antibiotics and is usually acquired in hospitals or nursing homes, spread from patient to patient by contaminated hands, clothing, and equipment. Infection with MRSA can range from pneumonia to flesh-eating diseases. About 0.5% of people in the U.S. have MRSA bacteria on their skin or in their noses and, although not infected, can still spread the bacteria to those at risk. The CDC estimates that 90,000 people die annually in the U.S. from hospital-acquired infections; about 17,000 of these deaths are due to MRSA. Agencies can now reduce and perhaps stop the spread of MRSA infection by following the guidelines of a pilot program of the Pittsburgh, PA, Veterans Affairs Healthcare System.

Patient care

The Pittsburgh guidelines require that all patients have their noses swabbed for MRSA on admission and discharge. Those with MRSA are isolated from other patients and are cared for in protective isolation. Noninvasive equipment is disinfected after each use with these patients, and strict hand hygiene policies are applied. As a result, there was a drop of more than 70% of MRSA cases in surgical care units. The VA, because of the Pittsburgh results, plans to expand the program to more than 150+ VA hospitals nationwide. The CDC suggests screening high-risk patients (those with weak immune systems, intensive care patients, and patients in nursing homes), rather than recommending universal screening. However, Denmark, Finland, and the Netherlands have essentially eradicated MRSA by using universal screening methods. In addition to screening everyone, agencies may provide MRSA carriers with special soap and antibiotic nasal creams. Additionally, a gene-based MRSA test provides results in hours as opposed to days.

See also: Staphylococcus
References in periodicals archive ?
The first study used an in vitro bioburden model in which AC5 and control media were exposed to the same levels of three common and potentially pathogenic wound bacteria: Staphylococcus epidermidis, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).
In recent years, MRSA strains have shown resistance to antibiotics other than [beta]-lactam groups, thus treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections becoming extensively bothersome and distressing.2 Considering origin of MRSA, it is assumed that methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) attained the mecA gene through parallel transmission from coagulase-negative staphylococci.
Vital signs: epidemiology and recent trends in methicillin resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections--United States, 2002-2017.
The new data reflect rates for all Staphylococcus aureus infections: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).
Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus as a predominantly healthcareassociated pathogen: a possible reversal of roles?
Demographic and genotypic data of the methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates Patient's details Isolate name Gender Age Hospital Timepoints (years) G703N1B1C1 F 37 Tertiary Admission G703N2B1C1 After 48 hours Isolate name Resistance genes Virulence factors G703N1B1C1 blaZ, NOR(A), fosD, aur, hlb, hlgA, hlgB, dfrG, parC, parE, hlgC, lukD, lukE, gyrA, gyrB, fosB, sak, scn, seg, sei, TcaA, TCaB, MATE, sem, sen, seo, seu, AcrB splA, splB, eta G703N2B1C1 blaZ, NOR(A), fosD, aur, hlb, hlgA, hlgB, dfrG, parC, parE, hlgC, lukD, lukE, gyrA, gyrB, fosB, sak, scn, seg, sei, TcaA, TCaB, MATE, sem, sen, seo, seu, AcrB, tet(K) splA, splB, eta Isolate name Plasmids MLST G703N1B1C1 -- ST121 G703N2B1C1 repL ST121 (pDLK1), rep (SAP060B), rep (SAP015B) MLST = multilocus sequence typing.
Predictors of community-associated Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections in primary-care settings.
Epidemiology of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus lineages in five major African towns: high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes.
[USPRwire, Tue Oct 31 2017] Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) Infections - Pipeline Review, H2 2015 Summary Global Markets Direct s, Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA) Infections - Pipeline Review, H2 2015 , provides an overview of the Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus Aureus (MSSA) Infections s therapeutic pipeline.
(Inducible Clindamycin resistance in clinical isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus).
Comparison of mortality risk associated with bacteremia due to methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2007;28(3):273-9.
Wound and abscess cultures that were tested found methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) to be the most prevalent gram-positive organism (37.1%) found in inpatients, while for outpatients, methicillin-resistant S.