methanogen

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meth·an·o·gen

(meth-an'ō-jen),
Any methane-producing bacterium of the family Methanobacteriaceae.

methanogen

(mə-thăn′ə-jən)
n.
Any of various anaerobic archaea that produce methane as a metabolic byproduct.

meth·an·o·gen

(meth-an'ō-jen)
Any methane-producing bacterium of the family Methanobacteriaceae.

methanogen

any BACTERIUM that can produce methane. The methanogens are found in the DOMAIN ARCHAEA, and form methane under anaerobic conditions, as an energy-yielding process.
References in periodicals archive ?
Methanogens are very diverse in terms of phylogeny and ecology.
Among the archaea-related proteins, 667 proteins were related to 15 genera of cultivable archaeal methanogens. As shown in Figure S5(a), M.
Verstraete, "Methanosarcina: the rediscovered methanogen for heavy duty biomethanation," Bioresource Technology, vol.
Methane can be generated in two ways by two types of methanogens: (a) acetoclastic methanogens that produce methane from acetic acid and (b) hydrogenotrophic methanogens that utilize hydrogen to reduce carbon dioxide.
Mountfort, Asher, Mays and Tiedje (1980) suggested that the function of the SRB depends on the existing levels of sulfates, because they oxidize acetate at high concentrations, whereas producing acetate at low levels of sulfates releasing substrate for methanogens. The experiments of Banat and Nedwell (1983) with inhibitors of sulfate-reduction showed that the SRB are the main microorganisms responsible for the oxidation of acetate to C[O.sub.2] in salt marsh sediments, while the proportion of acetate that was metabolized to methane was negligible.
Pramanik P, Kim PJ (2013) Effect of limited nickel availability on methane emission from EDTA treated soils: Coenzyme M an alternative biomarker for methanogens. Chemosphere 90, 873-876.
A concern with food additives is that the methanogens in the rumen might adapt to their new diet after a time and resume methane production at the same level.
"The rumen methanogens turned out to be highly similar species in all rumens across the world," AgResearch scientist Dr Peter Janssen said in the statement.
Manure and crop residues probably stimulated the activity of methanogen that produce C[H.sub.4].
"We have advanced that in the Niger Delta, a group of organisms known as methanogens are now playing major roles in bio-corrosion episodes We have also advanced that oil field microorganisms are getting more and more resistant to biocides used to control corrosion and there is need for alternative mitigation approaches."