methanogen

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meth·an·o·gen

(meth-an'ō-jen),
Any methane-producing bacterium of the family Methanobacteriaceae.

methanogen

(mə-thăn′ə-jən)
n.
Any of various anaerobic archaea that produce methane as a metabolic byproduct.

meth·an·o·gen

(meth-an'ō-jen)
Any methane-producing bacterium of the family Methanobacteriaceae.

methanogen

any BACTERIUM that can produce methane. The methanogens are found in the DOMAIN ARCHAEA, and form methane under anaerobic conditions, as an energy-yielding process.
References in periodicals archive ?
The activity of methanogenic bacteria, the decomposition rate of soil organic matter, and [CH.sub.4] production and transport rate all increased with soil temperature.
One can propose several hypotheses to explain the observed phylogenetic constraints for the competence to harbor significant amounts of methanogenic bacteria, but the most straightforward interpretation of our results postulates the presence of a receptor for methanogenic bacteria.
Zehnder, "Reductive dechlorination of 1,2-dichloroethane and chloroethane by cell suspensions of methanogenic bacteria," Biodegradation, vol.
The oil may have either suppressed the activities of the microbial population or killed some protozoa that are co-host to methanogenic bacteria.
Methanospirillum, a new genus of methanogenic bacteria, and characterization of Methanospirillum hungatei sp.
ALGAS concluded that methanogenic bacteria can only function at redox potential levels below -200 mV and that a correlation exists between methane emission and soil redox potential.
The acetic acid is then used by methanogenic bacteria to produce methane gas.
Because of the difficulty experienced in enriching for methanogenic bacteria, only activity assays were performed for these bacteria, as described below.
Domestic wastewaters that contain appreciable concentrations of sulfate have raised concerns over adverse effects on organic reduction because of the competition between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria. However, a comparative study of anaerobic filters and sludge bed systems indicated no significant difference between the performance of the two systems in the presence of sulfate.
The microbial cultures used in anaerobic wastewater treatment are highly complex and include fermentative bacteria, hydrogen-producing acetogens (HPA), and methanogenic bacteria (MB) [2, 3].