methanogen

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meth·an·o·gen

(meth-an'ō-jen),
Any methane-producing bacterium of the family Methanobacteriaceae.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

methanogen

(mə-thăn′ə-jən)
n.
Any of various anaerobic archaea that produce methane as a metabolic byproduct.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

meth·an·o·gen

(meth-an'ō-jen)
Any methane-producing bacterium of the family Methanobacteriaceae.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

methanogen

any BACTERIUM that can produce methane. The methanogens are found in the DOMAIN ARCHAEA, and form methane under anaerobic conditions, as an energy-yielding process.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(2000) The metal-free hydrogenase from methanogenic archaea: evidence for a bound cofactor.
Kunte found that separating the overall digestion process into discrete acidifying and methanogenic stages--thereby isolating the acidogenic bacteria in their own tank--resulted in complete eradication of live pathogens.
Four groups of microbes are known to be geologically significant in petroliferous subsurface settings (Machel and Foght, 2000), namely aerobic respiratory bacteria, and three anaerobic groups that commonly live in consortia (symbiotic communities): fermentative, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic bacteria.
If the bacteria run out of sulfate, methanogenic bacteria take over as the dominant metabolic force, said Kirk.
Acetylene inhibition of methanotrophs and removal of oxygen isolated methanogenic activity in the soil.
When sulfate is depleted, methanogenic archaea become the dominant anaerobic microbial population.
Rapid benzene degradation in methanogenic sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer.
Complete genome sequence of the methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii.
Chapters are dedicated to microorganisms involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling as well as iron- and manganese-reducing, aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing (Knallgas), methanogenic, and methylotrophic bacteria.