methane clathrate

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methane clathrate

A potential source of clean fuel formed when methane produced by bacteria on the ocean floor dissolve and crystallise. While methane clathrate deposits are thought to represent 2–10 times the volume of natural gas, extraction with current technologies is not seen as commercially viable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Methane hydrate is formed from a mixture of methane and water under certain pressure and conditions.
Only with sophisticated models like this, he says, can we accurately see the possibilities of offshore permafrost melt--including methane hydrates.
In 2011-12, the Department of Energy (DOE) teamed up with ConocoPhillips in a $29 million project to drill a well into a bed of methane hydrate.
The vehicle also collected gas samples from methane hydrates in the area.
Bottom: Scientists are interested in factors that affect the stability of methane hydrates, such as these exposed on the seafloor at Barkley Canyon.
Japan succeeded in extracting natural gas from methane hydrate contained in geologic layers hundreds of meters below the seafloor in the Pacific Ocean in March, but exploration in the Sea of Japan area has lagged behind because the resource exists in a form believed to be more difficult to produce.
Methane hydrates are also a potential energy resource that could be exploited in future.
8220;This material has been responsible for many of the world's most devastating ocean floor land slides, so extreme care must be taken to ensure the ocean bed remains stable after the methane hydrate has been removed.
The current gas hydrate programs and budgets involving methane hydrate is also discussed in This offering.
Japan is currently studying the economic feasibility of conducting limited methane hydrate development off its southern seaboard, near Aichi Prefecture.
Beyond that, there are massive methane hydrate resources under the ocean floor and in the Arctic.
gas hydrate research by the Methane Hydrate R&D Act of 2000, which was extended as part of EPACT in 2005.