Metastasis

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metastasis

 [mĕ-tas´tah-sis]
1. the transfer of disease from one organ or part to another not directly connected with it. It may be due either to the transfer of pathogenic microorganisms (e.g., tubercle bacilli) or to the transfer of cells, as in malignant tumors. See also cancer.
2. a growth of pathogenic microorganisms or of abnormal cells distant from the site primarily involved by the morbid process. adj., adj metastat´ic.
Metastasis: A metastatic cascade occurs in several steps, marked 1 through 7. From Damjanov, 2000.

me·tas·ta·sis

, pl.

me·tas·ta·ses

(mĕ-tas'tă-sis, -sēz),
1. The shifting of a disease or its local manifestations, from one part of the body to another, as in mumps when the symptoms referable to the parotid gland subside and the testis becomes affected.
2. The spread of a disease process from one part of the body to another, as in the appearance of neoplasms in parts of the body remote from the site of the primary tumor; results from dissemination of tumor cells by the lymphatics or blood vessels or by direct extension through serous cavities or subarachnoid or other spaces.
3. Transportation of bacteria from one part of the body to another, through the bloodstream (hematogenous metastasis) or through lymph channels (lymphogenous metastasis).
Synonym(s): secondaries (1)
[G. a removing, fr. meta, in the midst of, + stasis, a placing]

metastasis

(mĭ-tăs′tə-sĭs)
n. pl. metasta·ses (-sēz′) Medicine
1. Transmission of pathogenic microorganisms or cancerous cells from an original site to one or more sites elsewhere in the body, usually by way of the blood vessels or lymphatics.
2. A secondary cancerous growth formed by transmission of cancerous cells from a primary growth located elsewhere in the body.

met′a·stat′ic (mĕt′ə-stăt′ĭk) adj.
met′a·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

metastasis

Plural, metastases Oncology The distal spread of a malignancy, either by penetration of a blood or lymphatic vessel or by spread along a serosal membrane with later development into a 2nd focus of malignancy. See Blow-out metastasis, Cannonball metastasis, Micrometastasis, Skip metastasis.

me·tas·ta·sis

, pl. metastases (mĕ-tas'tă-sis, -sēz)
1. The shifting of a disease or its local manifestations, from one part of the body to another, as in mumps when the symptoms referable to the parotid gland subside and the testis becomes affected.
2. The spread of a disease process from one part of the body to another, as in the appearance of neoplasms in parts of the body remote from the site of the primary tumor; results from dissemination of tumor cells by the lymphatics or blood vessels or by direct extension through serous cavities or subarachnoid or other spaces.
3. Transportation of bacteria from one part of the body to another, through the bloodstream (hematogenous metastasis) or through lymph channels (lymphogenous metastasis).

metastasis

(mĕ-tăs′tă-sis) plural.metastases [″ + stasis, stand]
1. Movement of bacteria or body cells (esp. cancer cells) from one part of the body to another.
Enlarge picture
METASTASES: CT scan of liver (upper left) with round metastatic tumors (Courtesy of Harvey Hatch, MD, Curry General Hospital)
2. Change in location of a disease or of its manifestations or transfer from one organ or part to another not directly connected. See: illustration

The usual application is to the manifestation of a malignancy as a secondary growth arising from the primary growth in a new location. The malignant cells may spread through the lymphatic circulation, the bloodstream, or avenues such as the cerebrospinal fluid.

metastatic (mĕt″ă-stăt′ĭk), adjective

metastasis

1. The spread or transfer of any disease, but especially cancer, from its original site to another place in the body where the disease process starts up. Metastasis usually occurs by way of the bloodstream or the lymphatic system or, in the case of lung disease by coughing and re-inhalation of particles to other parts of the lung.
2. The new focus of disease, so produced.

metastasis

the process of cancerous tissue spreading to various parts of the body.

Metastasis (plural, metastases)

The spread of disease from one part of the body to another, as when cancer cells appear in parts of the body remote from the site of the primary tumor.

me·tas·ta·sis

, pl. metastases (mĕ-tas'tă-sis, -sēz)
1. Spread of a disease process from one part of the body to another, as in the appearance of neoplasms in parts of the body remote from the site of the primary tumor; results from dissemination of tumor cells by the lymphatics or blood vessels or by direct extension through serous cavities or subarachnoid or other spaces.
2. Transportation of bacteria from one part of the body to another, through the bloodstream or through lymph channels.

Patient discussion about Metastasis

Q. I have met my close friend after 3 years. She is showing some signs of high depression. How can I help her? I have met my very close friend after 3 years and she is very depressed. I am worried that she is showing some signs of high depression. She talks all rubbish and negatives these days which is filled with that nonsense hopelessness. She was fine and going good when I left her and now she is completely negative in her behavior and also very depressed. She is not able to enjoy my company. She had lost her weight and her eyes reflect the bluntness. She keeps silent most of the time. How can I help her?

A. I think first you must talk to her and find out about when and how this started. Take her to all the places where you both used to go. She might have come across difficult phase in these years which would have made her depressed and she may need a support to bring her back to normal way of living. We cannot say that this is a depression which would get cured by just talking and knowing the reasons but you must help her to fight back for the thing she had lost. If there is no desired result, then do consult a physician.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P9QxddJOQY4&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vP9QxddJOQY4_nervous_system_depression_psyche?q=depression&feature=player_embedded

Q. Does staging in breast cancer is linked to metastasis and what is the use of staging?

A. stages in cancer tell of it's progress. is it benign, does it have a capsule, did it metastasized and all that. but if you are looking for more accurate and more information on that in general:
http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/diagnosis/staging.jsp

this should do it!

Q. What is the best pathophysiology of colorectal cancer. The pathophysiology just has to be brief and concise. It also has to include nursing considerations for the patient.

A. i'm not sure i understand your question...do you mean what is the best treatment for colorectal cancer? patophysiology is the changes the tissue acquired. if you'll give me more details on what you are looking for i'll be more then happy to help you.

More discussions about Metastasis
References in periodicals archive ?
Sixty-five percent of BM metastases (49 out of 75 lesions) had converted into structural destructive bone metastatic lesions in those patients who underwent posttreatment 18F-FDG-PET/CT.
When the sites of renal metastases were unilateral, surgical resection or radiotherapy for the involved kidney is an attractive option, whereas both modalities could not be considered in our case with bilateral and multiple renal metastatic lesions.
Surgical treatment such as pancreatico-duodenectomy could be an option for isolated metastatic lesions to the ampulla of Vater in select symptomatic patients with good performance status and no other sites of metastatic disease.
This was associated with a mixed response seen on imaging, as evidenced by some metastatic lesions responding while others progressed.
In view of the widely varying appearances of hepatic abscesses on imaging, and their ability to masquerade as metastatic lesions, it may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis with a needle biopsy.7 In this case the liver lesion presented atypically, with characteristics of both liver abscess and liver metastasis.
In one robust prospective study of soft tissue masses, only 3% were metastatic lesions [1].
From the results of this study, it was shown that high local control may be obtained by CIRT with suppressing adverse reactions and that an effect comparable to surgical resection may be obtained regarding metastatic lesions of a certain size.
Therefore, prior to any treatment of a presumed pathologic fracture or metastatic lesion, it is essential a confirmed diagnosis is made.
Except that hemangiomas can exhibit peripheral rim enhancement, the presence of such enhancement could also be observed in hepatic metastatic lesions. However, the peripheral rim enhancement in a metastatic lesion often has a serrated margin and not a nodular margin as seen in a hemangioma13.
The differential diagnosis at this point included a metastatic lesion from ACC versus renal cell carcinoma vs melanoma.
Our recording of palatine tonsil as metastatic lesion of amelanotic melanoma is the first worldwide.
The HSE found a radiologist "failed to identify something highly suggestive of a metastatic lesion".

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