metalloid

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metalloid

 [met´ah-loid]
1. any element with both metallic and nonmetallic properties.
2. any metallic element that does not have all the characters of a typical metal.

met·al·loid

(met'ă-loyd),
Resembling a metal in at least one amphoteric form, for example, silicon and germanium as semiconductors.
[metal + G. eidos, resemblance]

met·al·loid

(met'ă-loyd)
Resembling a metal in at least one amphoteric form.
[metal + G. eidos, resemblance]
References in periodicals archive ?
Arsenic (As) is a metalloid widely distributed in natural environments [1].
Some metals and metalloids like Cu and As preferably form complexes with organic materials and thereby enhance their mobility (Kloss et al.
Therefore, we included one metalloid (As), six heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Pb, Co, Zn and Cu) and laboratory grade calcium chloride (Ca[Cl.sub.2]) for comparison.
: Abstract.- Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) grown around refuse and effluent sites of District Sargodha, Pakistan were analyzed for six metals and metalloids viz., cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), arsenic (As), zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se) by atomic absorption spectrophotometric method.
Transformation and mobilization of metals, metalloids, andradionuclides by microorganisms.
(2007), the ability of microorganisms to survive but not grow in the presence of metals, metalloids cations or oxyanions, either alone or in combination, defines tolerance.
Recent rapid and progressive development of technology and industry has led to increasing the proportion of various environmental pollutants, such as pesticides, toxic xenobiotics, metals, metalloids, and halogenated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [1].
Researchers at Yale University, led by Prof Thomas Graedel, analysed the use of 62 metals or metalloids commonly found in popular technology, such as smartphones.
The paper, written by researchers at Yale University, identified 62 metals or metalloids used to make a range of products.
They present nine chapters discussing: the molecular-scale fundament of geothermal fluid thermodynamics, thermodynamics of aqueous species at high temperatures and pressures (equations of state and transport theory), the carbonate system as an example of mineral solubility and aqueous speciation in hydrothermal conditions to 300 degrees Celsius, thermodynamic modeling of fluid-rock interaction at mid-crustal to upper-mantle conditions, speciation and transport of metals and metalloids in geological vapors, solution calorimetry under hydrothermal conditions, structure and thermodynamics of subduction zone fluids from spectroscopic studies, and thermodynamics of organic transformations in hydrothermal fluids.
For 12 of the metals and "metalloids" off the periodic table that are on the Yale list, the "substitute potential" is rated at low to very low.
Arsenic is a ubiquitous and one of the most potent toxic metalloids in environment.