parageusia

(redirected from Metallic taste)

parageusia

 [par″ah-goo´zhah]
perversion of the sense of taste. adj., adj parageu´sic.

dys·geu·si·a

(dis-gū'sē-ă),
Distortion or perversion in the perception of a tastant. An unpleasant perception may occur when a normally pleasant taste is present, or the perception may occur when no tastant is present (gustatory hallucination).
Synonym(s): parageusia
[dys- + G. geusis, taste]

par·a·geu·si·a

(par'ă-gū'sē-ă)
Disordered or abnormal sense of taste.
[para- + G. geusis, taste]
References in periodicals archive ?
Some patients report a metallic taste. The sense of taste typically returns once treatments stop.
Inhaled elemental mercury can cause vomiting, difficulty of breathing, cough, metallic taste, and bleeding and swollen gums.
) The cynicism in this scene, as with a following one at the Great Council, is played for laughs, but it leaves a metallic taste: where are the women or minorities on this hifalutin Council?
Within a few hours of the explosion, dozens of people fell ill with radiation sickness, suffering terrible headaches, uncontrollable coughing and vomiting fits, and experiencing a metallic taste in their mouths.
You have a metallic taste in your mouth which you can't get rid of, your period is late and your breasts are sore.
Initially there may be metallic taste, dry mouth, difficulty in swallowing, nausea, dehydration, colicky abdominal pain, generalized weakness followed by muscular pain and numbness in hands and feet.
An easy way to tell if you're getting too much selenium is that you'll either have garlic breath or a metallic taste in your mouth.
Among the items Fox distributes are Ford Warriors in Pink bandannas, lotion, calendars, pens, notepads, adult coloring books, coloring pencils, and lemon drops or ginger chews to get rid of dryness, nausea or metallic taste in patients' mouths when undergoing treatment.
Anyone who has gone through chemotherapy can tell you how the metallic taste in the mouth can destroy the appetite, and induce the terrible feeling of nausea and dizziness.
It also has the unfortunate effect of feeling funny on your teeth and giving the drink a vaguely metallic taste. A metal straw imparts a certain dressed-up sensibility, but as an instrument for consuming booze, it leaves something to be desired.
Not only is it made from up to 70 percent renewable resources, but it's also lighter than conventional cans and keeps out any metallic taste, ensuring that our products taste just like a homemade meal.