metabonomics


Also found in: Dictionary.

me·tab·o·nom·ics

(mĕt-ah-bō-nom'iks),
The metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiologic stresses or genetic modification as measured in a quantitative and time-related fashion; sometimes used to draft dietery guidelines.

metabonomics

The quantitative measurement of the dynamic, multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification, applying systems biology to the study of metabolic processes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study on serum and urine of renal interstitial fibrosis rats induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction based on metabonomics and network analysis methods.
1]H NMR metabonomics to breast cancer characterization and detection.
Currently, there were a lot of metabonomic researches on cardiovascular diseases.
Chaudhury, "A metabonomics approach as a means for identification of potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of endometriosis," Molecular BioSystems, vol.
Metabolic fingerprints of serum brain and liver are distinct for mice with cerebral and noncerebral malaria: a H NMR spectroscopy-based metabonomic study.
The metabonomics of aging and development in the rat: an investigation into the effect of age on the profile of endogenous metabolites in the urine of male rats using1H NMR and HPLC-TOF MS.
Our ongoing studies will involve metabonomics, whereby biological fluids can be subject to NIVIR (nuclear magnetic resonance) profiling to determine all the metabolites present.
A research team from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry (PCMD), University of Exeter, and University of Cambridge analysed data from 591 patients who participated in the Metabonomics and Genomics Coronary Artery Disease (MaGiCAD) study in Cambridgeshire, UK.
This type of metabolite analysis is often known as metabolite fingerprinting, or metabonomics.
Metabolomics or metabonomics has recently emerged as a novel method of PCa detection owing to its ability to monitor changes in the metabolic signature, within biofluids or tissue, that reflect changes in phenotype and function.
Omics' refers to outgrowths of the molecular biology, biochemistry and analytical chemistry applied in the Human Genome Project, including the new disciplines of nutrigenomics, metabonomics, foodomics, and proteomics.