nonvolatile acid

(redirected from Metabolic acid)

nonvolatile acid

An acid, such as lactic acid or sulfuric acid, that accumulates in the body as a result of digestion, disease, or metabolism. It cannot be excreted from the body by ventilation but must be excreted by organs other than the lungs, e.g., by acidification of the urine.
See also: acid
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References in periodicals archive ?
THAM is a proton acceptor (11) that can bind both carbon dioxide and metabolic acid, and due to its favorable buffer properties, THAM has been propagated as an effective alkalinizing agent in either respiratory or metabolic acidosis (3, 5, 12).
THAM can improve organ functions by rapidly correcting blood pH and maintaining acid-base balance in a state of acidemia, which has the potential to create organ dysfunction due to metabolic acid accumulation or carbon dioxide retention (13).
The anion gap calculation is akin to quantifying the current size of the individual's metabolic acid pool or 'fire'.
There was an associated metabolic acid base disturbance as detected by the ammonium chloride challenge test.
Cancer cells break down sugars and produce the metabolic acid lactate at a much higher rate than normal cells.
"Glucaric acid is the most common metabolic acid produced by the body after stomach acid," Hine notes.
Realizing that an increase in metabolic activity produces metabolic acid byproducts, such as lactic acid and dissolved carbon dioxide, Watson began using this slight acidity trend to diagnose a fast-oxidizing patient.
In concluding their paper, Poupin et al review key points about diet and the production of metabolic acids:
The presence of acid in the plasma will decrease its pH, so metabolic acids must be efficiently buffered and excreted.
An overabundance of protein also causes a build-up of metabolic acids in the body, which can interfere with healing and cause calcium to leach from the bones.
Limitating the intake of animal protein cuts secretion of urate and metabolic acids. This results in lower levels of acid-induced urinary calcium excretion and greater excretion of citrate, which forms a soluble complex with calcium, thus preventing supersaturation of calcium and oxalate.
The reason for limiting intake of animal protein is to reduce the secretion of urate and of metabolic acids. In turn this results in lower levels of acid-induced urinary calcium excretion and an increased excretion of citrate, which forms a soluble complex with calcium, thus preventing supersaturation of calcium and oxalate.