metatheory

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Related to Meta-theory: Metatheoretical

metatheory

(met?a-the'a-re, -ther'e)
1. Knowledge about a discipline. For nursing theory, it is the most global (abstract) type of nursing theory. It focuses on broad issues that address the profession's most important concepts: the relationships among human beings, health, the environment, and nursing itself. See: metaparadigm
2. A theory about the knowledge of a discipline, such as the nature and structure of nursing knowledge.
References in periodicals archive ?
the two dominant sociological perspectives that have been developed) in education is always problematic; but if it is to be successfully achieved, then, firstly, a coherent meta-theory needs to be articulated and enacted, and secondly, reifying and de-historising structural forms needs to be avoided, as this leads to a distortion and misunderstanding of social life and educational matters.
The developmental-contextual career meta-theory presents a convergent and ecological perspective of career development.
(13) And when it comes to the tax base, a second meta-theory comes into play that would predict failure for the group.
It is believed that as important as highlighting the ontological difference around the micro and macro social, is to highlight the commitment of the practice meta-theory, in our view, it seems to be the emphasis on lived action (immersion / engagement in activities) and intelligibility required to do so.
This position, or meta-theory abjures, is inimical to theorizing in the sense of, imposing, a reductive 'set of tools' or an interpretative frame.
As noted previously, the PhD program emphasizes nursing theory and meta-theory, which refines and expands nursing knowledge while the DNP utilizes this knowledge in their practice.
This scheme helps to illustrate that a practice-based approach to paradigms departs from the common meaning of the notion in organization studies and elsewhere: Metaphorically speaking, an understanding as "meta-theory," "world view" or "way of seeing" approaches the disciplinary matrix from its top, particularly stressing the level of metaphysical elements.
Resultantly, a conceptual analysis is placed within each chapter, which leads the reader to identify remnants of meta-theory and triangulation.
To give reasons for those processes--to explain the functions they serve and the effects they have--would require appeal to some causal meta-theory. The usual candidates for meta-theories are those represented in case books of canonical literary works: Freudianism, Marxism, deconstruction, feminism, and Foucauldian cultural critique ("New Historicism').
These principles do provide a basis for an appropriate meta-theory, I believe, but they need expanding upon and articulating into a more fully-blown philosophy.
* Less emphasis on theory and meta-theory development; the emphasis is on applying the theory to practice.