meta-analysis

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meta-analysis

 [met″ah-ah-nal´ĭ-sis]
any systematic method that uses statistical analysis to integrate the data from a number of independent studies.

meta-analysis

/meta-anal·y·sis/ (met″ah-ah-nal´ĭ-sis) a systematic method that takes data from a number of independent studies and integrates them using statistical analysis.

meta-analysis

a systematic method of evaluating statistical data based on results of several independent studies of the same problem.

meta analysis

A method that uses statistical techniques to combine results from different studies and obtain a quantitative estimate of the overall effect of a particular intervention or variable on a defined outcome—i.e., it is a statistical process for pooling data from many clinical trials to glean a clear answer. Meta-analysis produces a stronger conclusion than can be provided by any individual study.

Cons
Bias, potential for analytical sloppiness, lack of understanding of basic issues, failure to consider major covariates, and overstating the strengths and precision of the results.

meta-analysis

Data synthesis, quantitative overview Data analysis A systematic method that uses statistical techniques for combining results from different studies to obtain a quantitative estimate of the overall effect of a particular intervention or variable on a defined outcome; MA produces a stronger conclusion than can be provided by any individual study. See Cochran Collaboration, Cumulative meta-analysis.

meta-analysis

An attempt to improve the reliability of the findings of medical research by combining and analyzing the results of all discoverable trials on the same subject. In crude terms the advantages are obvious: trials that find against a hypothesis will cancel out the effect of those that find for it. Pooling of raw data is not, however, without statistical hazard and it has become apparent that meta-analysis can introduce its own sources of inaccuracy. The method is currently undergoing refinement.

meta-analysis

post-hoc statistical or trends analysis of data; i.e. analyisis of aggregated data from disparate experiments with similar research protocols
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The journal of Mental Health Counseling publication pattern review: A meta-study of author and article characteristics, 1994-2009.
The purpose of the current article is twofold: to provide a systematic meta-study of PSC that covers the first 15 years of published literature and, just as important, to identify and analyze movements or trends in publication patterns over time.
The JAMA meta-study is an ethically compromised drug analysis because it asks if an unapproved therapy approach yielded therapeutic good in the context of a disease.
Variables that can be analyzed in a meta-study consist of leading contributors, author demographic characteristics, author institutional characteristics, issues explored, article types, research designs implemented, participant characteristics, sample characteristics, or statistical methods used, among others.
What follows is an account of our research, including information on the meta-study framework we used, our selection of the dissertations for analysis, and our methods and procedures for analyzing the dissertations.
The largest effect of any analysis in this meta-study was demonstrated in the report of reliability data for the dependent variable under study [F(3, 118) = 17.
A meta-study may analyze variables such as contributing author demographic characteristics, leading contributors, author institutional characteristics, article types, issues explored, research designs used, participant or sample characteristics, or statistical methods used.
Tangredi uses the same methodology as in his earlier work: that of a meta-study.
A bounded qualitative meta-study was used and the methods, theories, and findings of the dissertations were examined.
The editors and contributors give and overview of basic methods, key stages in systematic reviews, methods of conducting meta-synthesis and meta-study of qualitative research, methods of conducting integrative reviews of qualitative and quantitative research, and ways to apply and use reviews in health services.
The UCLA meta-study estimated that between 33 and 66 percent of people on diets gained more weight than they lost over a period of up to five years after dieting.
In fact, looking at the meta-study by Judith Stacey and Timothy J.