meta-analysis

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meta-analysis

 [met″ah-ah-nal´ĭ-sis]
any systematic method that uses statistical analysis to integrate the data from a number of independent studies.

meta analysis

A method that uses statistical techniques to combine results from different studies and obtain a quantitative estimate of the overall effect of a particular intervention or variable on a defined outcome—i.e., it is a statistical process for pooling data from many clinical trials to glean a clear answer. Meta-analysis produces a stronger conclusion than can be provided by any individual study.

Cons
Bias, potential for analytical sloppiness, lack of understanding of basic issues, failure to consider major covariates, and overstating the strengths and precision of the results.

meta-analysis

Data synthesis, quantitative overview Data analysis A systematic method that uses statistical techniques for combining results from different studies to obtain a quantitative estimate of the overall effect of a particular intervention or variable on a defined outcome; MA produces a stronger conclusion than can be provided by any individual study. See Cochran Collaboration, Cumulative meta-analysis.

meta-analysis

An attempt to improve the reliability of the findings of medical research by combining and analyzing the results of all discoverable trials on the same subject. In crude terms the advantages are obvious: trials that find against a hypothesis will cancel out the effect of those that find for it. Pooling of raw data is not, however, without statistical hazard and it has become apparent that meta-analysis can introduce its own sources of inaccuracy. The method is currently undergoing refinement.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the result of the International Business Case Report (IBCR), a new meta study by European Diversity Research & Consulting.