Mesenteric Ischemia


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A condition characterised by intermittent severe ischaemia, resulting in abdominal colic, beginning 15–30 mins post-prandially, lasting 1–2 hours, and appearing when 2 or all 3—superior and inferior mesenteric and celiac—major abdominal arteries have severe atherosclerosis; because the intestine’s O2 demand increases with meals, patients avoid the pain by not eating, and thus lose weight; malabsorption may occur since absorption is O2-dependent
Management Bypass, endarterectomy, vascular reimplantation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

chronic mesenteric ischaemia

A condition characterised by intermittent severe ischaemia resulting in abdominal colic, beginning 15–30 minutes post-prandially and lasting 1-2 hours, which appears when 2 or all 3 of the superior and inferior mesenteric and coeliac major abdominal arteries have severe atherosclerosis. Because the intestine’s O2 demand increases with meals, patients may avoid the pain by not eating, thus losing weight. Malabsorption may occur because absorption is O2-dependent.

Popularly known as abdominal angina, chronic mesenteric ischaemia is preferred by journals that use British English, while chronic intestinal ischemia is used in journals that publish in American English.
 
Management
Bypass, endarterectomy, vascular reimplantation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty.
References in periodicals archive ?
Short bowel syndrome is detected in Crohn's disease, radiation enteritis, and mesenteric ischemia. This syndrome usually occurs in cases due to surgical elimination of major portion of small intestine
The major complication of Intestinal malrotation is midgut volvulus, which may result in mesenteric ischemia and if not immediately intervened, cause severe mortality and morbidity [1,2,3].
The primary concern was acute mesenteric ischemia, for which the patient underwent a selective SMA arteriography, which revealed a complete (100%) SMA occlusion with proximal intimal dissection and normal celiac axis (Figure 3).
Mesenteric Ischemia Mimicking ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.
Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is described as postprandial abdominal pain caused by intestinal hypoperfusion.
The incidence is 5%-15% of all mesenteric ischemia cases, and accurate diagnosis often requires the use of contrast-enhanced CT, which has a high sensitivity (90%-100%).
Mesenteric ischemia is a disease seen predominantly in the elderly that can be associated with considerable mortality if not detected before bowel infarction.
Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IIR) is one of such life-threatening events that occurs in serious conditions such as acute mesenteric ischemia, shock, mesenteric thrombosis, sepsis, or bowel transplantation [2-5].
Intestinal IR injury can occur in diverse conditions, including small bowel transplantation, acute mesenteric ischemia, hemorrhagic, and traumatic or septic shock [95].
Three of them were presumed to have generalized peritonitis, one acute pancreatitis, and one suspected to have mesenteric ischemia. Two of the cases were consulted to obstetric side for possible ruptured ovarian cyst.
However, there is lack of report on atrial fibrillation causing myocardial infarction and mesenteric ischemia at the same time.