mescaline

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mescaline

 [mes´kah-lēn]
a poisonous alkaloid derived from the flowering heads (mescal buttons) of a Mexican cactus; it is a hallucinogen, producing hallucinations of sound and color.

mes·ca·line

(mes'kă-līn),
The most active alkaloid present in the buttons of the mescal cactus, Lophophora williamsii. Mescaline produces psychotomimetic effects similar to those produced by LSD: alteration in mood, changes in perception, reveries, visual hallucinations, delusions, depersonalization, mydriasis, hippus, and increases in body temperature and blood pressure; psychic dependence, tolerance, and cross-tolerance to LSD and psilocybin develop; the principal component of peyote; 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylethylamine.

mescaline

(mĕs′kə-lēn′, -lĭn)
n.
A hallucinogenic alkaloid, C11H17NO3, obtained from peyote buttons and used by certain Native American tribes in religious rituals and illicitly as a recreational drug.

mescaline

A hallucinogenic psychotropic alkaloid derived from the peyote cactus (Lophophora williamsii), which is similar to indole alkaloids (e.g., psilocin, bufotenin, ibogaine) and LSD.

mescaline

Substance abuse A hallucinogenic psychotropic alkaloid, derived from the peyote cactus–Lophophora williamsii; it is similar to indole alkaloids–eg, psilocin, bufotenin, ibogaine, and LSD. See Hallucinogen.

mes·ca·line

(mes'kă-lin)
Naturally occurring psychedelic drug in long use, especially in Native American religious ceremonies; produces visual hallucinations and radically altered states of consciousness, often experienced as pleasurable and illuminating but occasionally as anxious or revolting. Schedule I hallucinogen; considered a poisonous alkaloid. Also called peyote.
[Sp. mezcal]

mescaline

a psychoactive drug that produces hallucinatory effects in humans probably by interfering with NORADRENALINE at nerve synapses.

mes·ca·line

(mes'kă-lin)
The most active alkaloid present in the buttons of the mescal cactus, Lophophora williamsii. Has psychotomimetic effects similar to those produced by lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).
[Sp. mezcal]
References in periodicals archive ?
In the writings of Huxley, it is clear that mescalin radically transformed the way he saw the world.
Because they both chose to take the same drug under controlled and supervised conditions, and because they both chose to write about their experiences afterwards, the accounts of Huxley and Zaehner of their experiments with mescalin are particularly interesting.
"I am not so foolish," Huxley commented, "as to equate what happens under the influence of mescalin or any other drug, prepared or in the future preparable, with the realization of the end and ultimate purpose of human life: Enlightenment, the Beatific Vision" (DP 58).
Huxley's book The Doors of Perception, written in 1954, describes the experiences of an afternoon in a Hollywood garden during which time he ingested mescalin, the active ingredient in the Mexican peyote cacti.
The benevolent drug world of marijuana, mescalin and other spongy hallucinogens that led Timothy Leary to urge my generation to "Turn on, tune in and drop out" had been transformed into the hard-edged, furtive, violent and decidedly non-groovy world of crack.
This is such a psychedelic desert sound, you can practically smell the mescalin