merozoite

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Related to Merozoites: sporozoite, schizonts, Gametocytes

merozoite

 [mer″o-zo´īt]
one of the organisms formed by multiple fission (schizogony) of a sporozoite within the body of the host.

mer·o·zo·ite

(mer'ō-zō'īt),
The motile infective stage of sporozoan protozoa that results from schizogony or a similar type of asexual reproduction; for example, endodyogeny or endopolygeny. Merozoites form at the surface of schizonts, blastophores, or invaginations into schizonts, and are responsible for the vast reproductive powers of sporozoan parasites; this is seen in human malaria, where the cyclic production of merozoites produces the typical fever and chill syndrome.
Synonym(s): endodyocyte (2)
[mero- + G. zōon, animal]

merozoite

(mĕr′ə-zō′īt)
n.
Any of the cells of an apicomplexan parasite that arise following multiple asexual fission and may enter either the asexual or sexual phase of the life cycle.

merozoite

A motile, pre- and extra-erythrocytic form of a sporozoan (e.g., plasmodia), resulting from the asexual division of a schizont during shizogony, which in Plasmodium spp occurs in the liver or red cells. Merozoites either infect other red cells or spontaneously develop into sexual forms—i.e., microgametes (male forms) or macrogametes (female forms).

mer·o·zo·ite

(mer'ŏ-zō'īt)
The motile infective stage of sporozoan protozoa that results from schizogony or a similar type of asexual reproduction; responsible for the vast reproductive powers of sporozoan parasites.
[mero- + G. zōon, animal]

merozoite

One of the stages in the life cycle of the malarial parasite. Merozoites are small motile bodies released in large numbers after asexual division of the schizont in red blood cells. They invade further red cells or liver cells where they continue to reproduce asexually or initiate a sexual reproduction cycle by the formation of male and female sex cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
These schizonts burst open releasing 2000-40000 uninucleate merozoites into the blood stream [39].
Immune Evasion by Merozoites. The mechanisms used for merozoite evasion include antigenic proteins.
Production and characterization of clinical grade Escherichia coli derived Plasmodium falciparum 42kDa merozoite Surface protein 1 ([MSP1.sub.42]) in the absence of an affinity tag.
Problems associated with the use of SYBR Green I and CD235A could be the loss of merozoites during washing process, resulting in the reduction of real parasitemia and the close correlation with the parasite growth stages.
During this liver phase, sporozoites undergo several asexual multiplications to form merozoites. Vesicles containing mature merozoites, merosomes, are released into the peripheral blood circulation and ruptured in the lungs to release thousands of merozoites into the blood circulation.
The parasite then moves to the liver where it develops into its next life stage, merozoites. Using the approach adopted in [6], susceptible individuals acquire malaria through contact with infectious mosquitoes at the rate [??].
A few of these oval bodies exhibited 4 spindle-shaped structures which were identified provisionally as merozoites of a coccidian parasite (Figure, panel C).
Quinine suppresses fever by preventing the release of merozoites from the liver into the bloodstream that rapidly reproduce and destroy red blood cells.
The active primary tissue schizont matures in about 7 days with the release of merozoites in the blood, causing acute malaria.
However, even when the same subdomain has been used such as in studies of EBA175, contradictory results have been achieved for whether there was a protective effect of antibodies or not [26, 27].When red cells burst due to egress of merozoites, a lot of "debris" will be left in the blood stream that needs to be removed, and many of the antibodies might help in doing this but this does not mean that the antibodies will protect from future disease.
There, they undergo liver stage development, culminating in the formation and release of tens of thousands of merozoites, the parasitic phase of development that infects red blood cells.
Inside the liver, the sporozoites change form and then grow and divide into thousands of merozoites. These in turn burst out from the liver cells and back into the blood.