cognition

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Related to Mental stimulus: cognitive process, cognitions

cognition

 [kog-nish´un]
the act or process of knowing, perceiving, or remembering. adj., adj cog´nitive.

cog·ni·tion

(kog-ni'shŭn),
1. Generic term embracing the mental activities associated with thinking, learning, and memory.
2. Any process whereby one acquires knowledge.
[L. cognitio]

cognition

(kŏg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The mental process of knowing, including aspects such as awareness, perception, reasoning, and judgment.
2. That which comes to be known, as through perception, reasoning, or intuition; knowledge.

cog·ni′tion·al adj.

mini-mental test

Neurology A brief clinical test of mental status, where each correct answer in a series of questions is given one point–total score 30
Mini-mental test
Orientation in time: Year, season, month, date, day–total 5 points–pts
Orientation in space Country, state, county, town, place, hospital ward–5 pts
Cognition Serial 7s–x 5 or spell world backwards–5 pts
Short recall Name 3 objects–total 3 pts
Memory Rename 3 above objects–3 pts
Follow a three-part command Take a paper, fold it, put it on the floor–3 pts
Common object recognition Name 2 familiar objects–2 pts
Recognition of common phrase 'No ifs, ands, or buts'–1 pt
Read and obey 'Close your eyes'–1 pt
Write simple sentence–1 pt
Copy drawing Intersecting pentagons–1 pt
A change in mental status and a score > 27 points is most often associated with affective depression; depressed Pts with cognitive impairment have scores of ± 20, those with true dementia often have scores of < 10 J Psych Res 1975; 12:189

cog·ni·tion

(kog-ni'shŭn)
1. The mental activities associated with thinking, learning, and memory.
2. Any process whereby one acquires knowledge.
[L. cognitio]

cognition

The mental processes by which knowledge is acquired. These include perception, reasoning and possibly intuition.

Cognition

The act or process of knowing or perceiving.

cog·ni·tion

(kog-ni'shŭn)
Generic term embracing mental activities associated with thinking, learning, and memory.
[L. cognitio]

Patient discussion about cognition

Q. What is cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment of depression? What is it all about? Please explain? Could someone who has actually had this explain what it is all about. I don't want to get a copy and paste answer from a web page somewhere, just a simple explanation in plain simple terms that I could relate to.

A. You mention "for example thoughts of worthlessness"

Could anyone identify other examples of these types of thoughts?

I struggle the most with guilt and shame.

Others:
What others think of me being a recovering alcoholic, someone who has depression, having a son who has been in a penitentiary several times.
---

What can anyone really do about these thoughts anyway. I have not come up with anything that works except to offer them all back up to God and let them all go.

What else could a professional come up that is any better than that? I would really like to know. Otherwise, what good would it really do?

More discussions about cognition
References in periodicals archive ?
Help the Aged spokeswoman Hilary Carter said: 'The fountain of eternal youth may not exist but a cocktail of gentle daily exercise, a good diet and enjoyable mental stimulus is definitely the key to enjoying a healthy and active old age.
"It gives me a chance to regroup and regain my patience, while providing a mental stimulus and making participants want to live again."
If they have enough mental stimulus, communication and variety they'll never wander.
It will give us tremendous mental stimulus if we manage to go through to the semi-finals.