mendelian inheritance

(redirected from Mendelian mutation)

men·de·li·an in·her·i·tance

(men-dē'lē-ăn in-her'i-tans),
inheritance in which stable and undecomposable characters controlled entirely or overwhelmingly by a single genetic locus are transmitted over many generations. See: Mendel first law, law of segregation, law of independent assortment.
Synonym(s): alternative inheritance (1)

Mendelian inheritance

Any hereditary process which can be explained in terms of simple mendelian genetics—segregation of chromosomes, independent assortment and homologous exchange.

men·de·li·an in·her·i·tance

(men-dē'lē-ăn in-her'i-tăns)
Inheritance in which stable and undecomposable characters controlled entirely or overwhelmingly by a single genetic locus are transmitted over many generations.
See: law of segregation, law of independent assortment

Mendelian inheritance

An inheritance pattern for autosomal gene pairs. The genetic trait displayed results from one parent's gene dominating over the gene inherited from the other parent.

Mendel,

Gregor Johann, Austrian geneticist, 1822-1884.
Mendel first law - factors that affect development retain their individuality from generation to generation, do not become contaminated when mixed in a hybrid, and become sorted out from one another when the next generation of gametes is formed. Synonym(s): law of segregation
Mendel second law - different hereditary factors assort independently when the gametes are formed. Synonym(s): law of independent assortment
mendelian character - an inherited character under the control of a single locus.
mendelian inheritance - inheritance in which stable and undecomposable characters controlled by a single genetic locus are transmitted over many generations. Synonym(s): alternative inheritance
mendelian ratio - the ratio of progeny with a particular phenotype or genotype expected in accordance with Mendel law among the offspring of matings specified as to genotype or phenotype.

men·de·li·an in·her·i·tance

(men-dē'lē-ăn in-her'i-tăns)
Inheritance in which stable and undecomposable characters controlled entirely or overwhelmingly by a single genetic locus are transmitted over many generations.
References in periodicals archive ?
To date, there have been no rare, large-effect Mendelian mutations described in HMGCR, presumably because such mutations are highly deleterious and not tolerated.
This can result in not only autosomal recessive diseases, but also produce rare discontinuous Mendelian mutations in which children are affected by diverse disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and hearing impairment simultaneously.
As with all essential amino acids, dietary protein intake provides the predominant source, and apart from cases of rare mendelian mutations, deficiencies rarely occur in well-nourished individuals.