melancholia

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melancholia

 [mel″an-ko´le-ah]
depression; currently used particularly to describe severe cases of major depressive disorder. adj., adj melanchol´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mel·an·cho·li·a

(mel'ăn-kō'lē-ă),
1. A severe form of depression marked by anhedonia, insomnia, psychomotor changes, and guilt.
2. A symptom occurring in other conditions, marked by depression of spirits and by a sluggish and painful process of thought.
Synonym(s): melancholy
[melan- + G. cholē, bile. See humoral doctrine]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

melancholia

(mĕl′ən-kō′lē-ə)
n.
Extreme, persistent sadness or hopelessness; depression. No longer in clinical use.

mel′an·cho′li·ac (-lē-ăk′) adj. & n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

melancholia

Medical history
In ancient usage, melancholia encompassed schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.
 
Psychiatry
In modern use, melanocholia refers to an array of mental or emotional symptoms of depression or despondency, which are now subsumed under major and minor depression and dysthymia.

Psychoanalysis
Severe depression characterised by a loss of interest in life activities, early morning awakening with intensification of symptoms, variable functionality, anorexia, weight loss and inappropriate sense of guilt. 

Melancholia contrasts to prolonged mourning (melancholy); Freud viewed melancholia as an impoverishment of the ego as there is an internal loss, while in mourning the loss is external. Because of the internal loss, the melancholic ego appears empty and has a shattered self-esteem, due to reproach and attack from the superego. It is more common in women and is accompanied by helplessness and suicide attempts or ideation.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

melancholia

melan, Greek, black; chole, bile Psychiatry Psychotic depression similar/identical to the depression of bipolar disease, characterized by severe depression, loss of interest in life activities, early morning awakening with intensification of Sx, marked ↑/↓ functionality, anorexia, weight loss, inappropriate sense of guilt. See Involutional melancholia. Cf Melancholy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mel·an·cho·li·a

(mel-ăn-kō'lē-ă)
1. A severe form of depression marked by anhedonia, insomnia, psychomotor changes, and guilt.
2. A symptom occurring in other conditions, marked by depression of spirits and by a sluggish and painful process of thought.
Synonym(s): melancholy.
[melan- + G. cholē, bile]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

melancholia

DEPRESSION.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"Diirer's Melencolia I: Melancholy and the Undecidable." Artibus et Historiae 15, no.
sotto la neve," here Gozzano genders Melencolia in the masculine.
Durer's Melencolia I has been the object of Agamben's recent reflection in Stanze where he writes: "L'angelo meditante non e ...
Duncan's "the black sun of the Melencolia" follows Nerval's emphases in "le Soleil noir de la Melancolie," while Blaser's "a melancholy black sun" is both less specific and more "ordinary." Similarly, Duncan offers a literal translation of "tombeau" in the fifth line as "tomb, " whereas Blaser renders it as "death." In the sixth line, Duncan reproduces "le Pausilippe et la mer d'Italie" as "Mount Posilipo and the Italian Sea," in contrast to Blaser's "the high hill above the Mediterranean." Duncan also maintains the entire set of mythical and historical allusions contained in the opposing pairs of Amor and Phoebus, Lusignan and Biron.
His face rests on his right hand in the classic attitude of melancholy--and perplexity--a pose traceable to Diirer's Melencolia 1, 1514.
Quixote's obsessive reading habits distort the aims of study espoused by Petrarch in De vita solitaria just as surely as they reproduce the indecision of Albrecht Durer's Melencolia I, which captures the exact moment when Melancholy abandons the tools of intellectual work to reflect upon their use or uselessness.
Spend some time studying the engraving Melencolia I of 1514, a work which "amazed all who saw it," according to Vasari.
The back cover puzzle is in honor of Albrecht Durer's 1514 etching "Melencolia I" and uses only the letters of the title.
Pepper are straight out of Albrecht Durer's Melencolia I, and the engraving's symbolism of hourglass, numerology, astrology, and geometry--even of the carpenter's nails on the floor--is also strangely appropriate.
Elkins argues that late in the sixteenth century perspective became increasingly employed as a statement of its own arcane and irrational character and that it was used to represent melancholia or as a figure of vanitas (such as in Durer's famous print, Melencolia I, or in Holbein's French Ambassadors).
Another famous magic square is the one appearing in Albrecht Durer's etching "Melencolia I".