megafauna

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Related to Megaherbivore: Pleistocene, megafauna, mastodon

megafauna

(mĕg′ə-fô′nə)
n. pl. megafauna or megafau·nas
Large or relatively large animals of a particular region, period, or habitat: Pleistocene megafauna; crabs and other aquatic megafauna.

meg′a·fau′nal adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mallon's results indicate that these megaherbivores (all weighing greater than 1,000 kg) had differing skull characteristics that would have allowed them to specialize in eating different types of vegetation.
The small number of species consumed in these pastures during the rainy season could be complemented by the cereal species, which are often consumed by these megaherbivores (Sam et al.
The suggestion put forward was that the large concentration of these megaherbivores in Michigan might be correlated with the widespread salt seeps and shallow saline waters that were present in the state at that time.
If these megaherbivores disappear from the ecosystem, their contribution to ecological processes will also be lost, and the path of the ecosystem will change irreversibly,' said Campos-Arceiz.
Summer rains, with a tropical/subtropical source, probably were necessary to sustain C4 productivity at levels consistent with the nearly pure C4 feeding by the megaherbivores.
Owen-Smith RN: Megaherbivores, the influence of very large body size on ecology.
I will refer later to the paleohistorical effects of megaherbivores in forests.
We need to accommodate large carnivores and megaherbivores and learn to live with them, as they form a fundamental piece of our living Eden--our common interest--otherwise our myths will simply vanish.
Owen-Smith (1992) defines megaherbivores of terrestrial systems as plant-feeding mammals that typically attain an adult body size in excess of one metric ton (e.
If these megaherbivores disappear from the ecosystem, their contribution to ecological processes will too be lost and the path of the ecosystem will change irreversibly," explained the lead author, who goes on to state that "the most probable consequences are the change in the structure of the undergrowth and the forest and the loss of certain species.
In modern Africa, he points out, the massive appetites of grazing and browsing megaherbivores such as elephants and rhinoceroses help to transform wooded savanna to open, short-grass savanna dominated by rapidly regenerating plants and herbs.