medium

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medium

 [me´de-um] (pl. mediums, me´dia) (L.)
1. an agent by which something is accomplished or an impulse is transmitted.
3. a preparation used in treating histologic specimens.
contrast medium a radiopaque substance used in radiography to permit visualization of body structures. Called also contrast agent.
culture medium a substance or preparation used to support the growth of microorganisms or other cells; called also medium.
dioptric media refracting media.
disperse medium dispersive m.
dispersion medium dispersive m.
dispersive medium the continuous phase of a colloid system; the medium in which the particles of the disperse phase are distributed, corresponding to the solvent in a true solution.
refracting media the transparent tissues and fluid in the eye through which light rays pass and by which they are refracted and brought to a focus on the retina.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·di·um

, pl.

me·di·a

(mē'dē-yŭm, -ă),
1. A means; that through or by which an action is performed.
2. A substance through which impulses or impressions are transmitted.
3. Synonym(s): culture medium
4. The liquid holding a substance in solution or suspension.
5. Any of the substances in which a chromatographic or electrophoretic separation is effected.
[L. neuter of medius, middle]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

medium

(mē′dē-əm)
n. pl. me·dia (-dē-ə) or me·diums
1. Something, such as an intermediate course of action, that occupies a position or represents a condition midway between extremes.
2. An intervening substance through which something else is transmitted or carried on.
3. pl. media
a. A surrounding environment in which something functions and thrives.
b. The substance in which a specific organism lives and thrives.
c. A culture medium.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

medium

Imaging
A substance used to enhance imaging of a particular structure.
 
Informatics
A material on which data is stored.

Microbiology
A liquid or solid matrix with nutrient designed to support the growth of microorganisms.

Medium types (microbiology)
Differential medium
Often solid and contains various chemical and other substances, e.g., colourants that may be produced by certain microorganisms, aiding in their identification.

Enrichment medium
Often liquid and contains specific nutrients to give one or more of the microorganisms a growth advantage.
 
Selective medium
Those in which nutrients are added to either promote the growth of one or more group of bacteria, or inhibitors (e.g., nalidixic acid, malachite green and others) to slow the growth of certain bacteria, giving the desired organisms a “selective” growth advantage.
 
Molecular biology
A gel on which a reaction can occur.
 
Paranormal
Channeler, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

medium

Imaging A substance used to enhance imaging of a particular structure. See Contrast medium, High-osmolality contrast medium, Low-osmolality contrast medium, Informatics A material on which data is stored. See Magnetic medium, Multimedia, Output medium.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

me·di·um

, pl. media (mē'dē-ŭm, -ă)
1. A means; that through which an action is performed.
2. A substance through which impulses or impressions are transmitted.
3. Synonym(s): culture medium.
4. The liquid holding a substance in solution or suspension.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

medium

Any substance in which micro-organisms may be cultured in an incubator. Most culture media use AGAR jelly or gelatine containing additional materials such as blood or meat broth to encourage bacterial growth. Selective media contain substances that discourage the growth of unwanted organisms or specifically foster the growth of others.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

medium

(pl. media) a substance on which microorganisms, other small organisms, cells and tissues can be cultured. A medium can be liquid or solid. If solid, it frequently contains AGAR, a stiffening agent extracted from seaweed. Culture media can contain all necessary nutrients and trace elements for normal growth (a minimal medium) but can also be supplemented. For example, ANTIBIOTICS can be added to test for antibiotic resistance in bacteria.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

me·di·um

, pl. media (mē'dē-ŭm, -ă)
1. A means; that through or by which an action is performed.
2. Liquid holding another substance in solution or suspension.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Notes on early interpretations of mediumship. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 26, 855-865.
Before the statistical analysis, spectral power values were converted to the unit Log [[micro]V2] /Hz, given that this is the most frequently unit used in recent studies on mediumship (18).
Like Ram's work, Stories of the Flesh similarly addresses issues of habitus, subjectivity, presence, and power in female mediumship and possession in the context of the capricious south Indian goddess Mariyamman.
Vietnamese spirit mediumship ritual has emerged from popular theatre, the entertainment of ordinary people, performed in remote areas on special occasions to celebrate the divinities.
While answers to such questions remain a mystery, modern brain imaging offers the potential for new discoveries about mediumship.
Such writing dismissed 'exotic' practices such as spirit mediumship as things that: 'still seep into the culture of Lanna, but only in a superficial way, as an outer shell that is not particularly meaningful [mai mi sara]'.
This essay also examines why some African American women became mediums, their role in Harlem's lucrative numbers racket, and how various African American middle-class leaders and cultural critics perceived black mediumship. This study is guided by the premise that black female mediums used Harlem's informal economy and underworld of commercial leisure to create alternative avenues of income and to practice nonconventional forms of religion and spiritual practices.
Dealing with the latter explicitly, she looks at how mediumship represented a significant symbolic challenge to traditional cultural forms and gender roles.
NM: How do you prepare for you mediumship readings?
While it is undoubtedly true that, as Susan Rowland argues in her article, In the red kitchen offers "a critique of Victorian culture" (2000: 203), the book uneasily combines its suggestion that female mediumship was predominantly a response to patriarchal culture with the possibility of genuine spirit communication.
Duncan was found guilty of fake mediumship and sentenced to a pounds 1 fine or a month in prison.
is not a fictional fantasy novel, but rather the genuine spiritual story of the Nature People who live in an Aetheric Plane, as told in their own words through von Lahr's mediumship and telepathy.